More

Why Tim Kaine delivering an entire speech in Spanish meant the world to me as a Latina.

To get your message across, sometimes you have to speak their language.

Why Tim Kaine delivering an entire speech in Spanish meant the world to me as a Latina.

Whether Hillary Clinton is elected the first female president on Nov. 8 or not, the Democratic campaign has already made history several times.

Not to overstate the obvious, but this is the first time in our history that a woman is nominated from a major party for the highest office in the land. This is the first time a former first lady has gone on to run for the office once held by her husband. This is also the first time a major player in the presidential election is fluent in Spanish.

Most recently, vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine delivered an entire speech to a huge crowd in Phoenix ... in Spanish.

On Nov. 3, 2016, he spoke at a community center in Maryvale, which is considered the most Latino neighborhood in the Phoenix area. And, amazingly, Kaine took the time to address that demographic in their language.


Image by Kelly Presnell/Arizona Daily Star.

Kaine learned Spanish over 35 years ago when he spent a year in Honduras with Jesuit missionaries in 1980.

Although he's proudly shown off his Spanish-speaking chops on the campaign trail with a phrase here and there, he's never delivered a whole speech in another language.

This time, he delivered the whole enchilada! (Pardon the pun.)

In this speech, Kaine acknowledged our collective frustrations with the election.

"I feel the same way about this election as you do. With so much talk of the Hispanic community coming into play, it was important for our campaign to address you in a language spoken by so many families across the country," Kaine said.

Kaine also called for something we all want: unity. He said we need people of all origins to help write the next chapters of our country's history. Yes, please!

Spanish-speaking parents and grandparents, many of whom don't speak English, will be voting on Nov. 8, and that's why this speech was a big deal.

Latinos have a huge deciding power in this presidential election. There are over 27 million of us eligible to vote this year, and we know we've got power.

Reaching out to my demographic by using our native language is not only a smart move, but also an empathetic one, which I love. It's an acknowledgment that not all of us are fluent in both languages. It's a reach across the divide to meet us halfway. It's an added effort to make sure we all understand his message.

Kaine's speech made me feel like my community, the Latino community, matters.

Finally, we're important enough that one of the major party's vice presidential candidates is addressing us directly.

Image by AP Photo/Matt York.

Kaine spokeswoman Karen Finney told reporters on the senator's plane, "No other person on a presidential ticket in the United States has given a full campaign speech in Spanish. So it's unprecedented and historic."

If only I could have taken my grandmother, who can no longer walk long distances, to this rally.

I so wish she could have heard his message of unity. I know she would have felt how far we've come. Politicians are trying to reach us — us! — the Latino community, by speaking our language.

The bottom line is that Kaine's effort to speak our language shows that he cares. He knows we're here to stay. He knows it's better to embrace everything that brings us together — including language. Whether his speech translates into more votes in Arizona remains to be seen, but I know that for me, the gesture will never be forgotten.

True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less
via Tom Ward / Instagram

Artist Tom Ward has used his incredible illustration techniques to give us some new perspective on modern life through popular Disney characters. "Disney characters are so iconic that I thought transporting them to our modern world could help us see it through new eyes," he told The Metro.

Tom says he wanted to bring to life "the times we live in and communicate topical issues in a relatable way."

In Ward's "Alt Disney" series, Prince Charming and Pinocchio have fallen victim to smart phone addiction. Ariel is living in a polluted ocean, and Simba and Baloo have been abused by humans.

Keep Reading Show less
True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less

With many schools going virtual, many daycare facilities being closed or limited, and millions of parents working from home during the pandemic, the balance working moms have always struggled to achieve has become even more challenging in 2020. Though there are more women in the workforce than ever, women still take on the lion's share of household and childcare duties. Moms also tend to bear the mental load of keeping track of all the little details that keep family life running smoothly, from noticing when kids are outgrowing their clothing to keeping track of doctor and dentist appointments to organizing kids' extracurricular activities.

It's a lot. And it's a lot more now that we're also dealing with the daily existential dread of a global pandemic, social unrest, political upheaval, and increasingly intense natural disasters.

That's why scientist Gretchen Goldman's refreshingly honest photo showing where and how she conducted a CNN interview is resonating with so many.

Keep Reading Show less

Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

Keep Reading Show less