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When you walk the floor at night thinking about how women are treated, these people are, too.

A wonderful project presents stories of women you'll never want to forget. And that's just the beginning.

When you walk the floor at night thinking about how women are treated, these people are, too.

It's the answer to the central moral challenge of our time.

The oppression of women is finally starting to end.

It takes a thousand different forms in a thousand different places, creating an interwoven mesh of cruelty. It encompasses physical abuse, sex-trafficking and prostitution, restricted access to education and opportunity, and more.


What's changed is that women are confronting the abuse head-on.

They're doing it all over the world, empowered by the knowledge of each other's presence and struggle.

Two journalists wrote a best seller about it.

In 2009, journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn released "Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide." It became a phenomenon.

"Women hold up half the sky." — Mao Zedong

They wanted to let people know and take heart from the exciting changes they were starting to see.

Half the Sky is now a movement.

Inspired by the book, the women and men of Half the Sky are committed to raising awareness of the problems women face and providing real solutions. Supporters have donated over $5 million to organizations supporting women and girls.

There was the movie.

The movement's first major video production is the "Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide" film that ran in four parts on PBS. It's now available on DVD.

This is the trailer.

The show visited 10 countries around the world.

Kristof was accompanied by A-listers like America Ferrera, Eva Mendes, and Gabrielle Union. They met with women and girls struggling to overcome terrible obstacles and recorded their heartache and triumph.

These are intimate and powerful stories you won't want to forget.

Half the Sky also has a Facebook game that's a lot more than fun.

The game raises awareness about real issues, but here's the best part: Players unlock real-world donations from Half the Sky partners during gameplay.

There are also mobile games for developing communities.

Of the 3.5 billion cellphones in the world, over 65% of them are in developing countries, and Half the Sky is helping to produce and distribute games for these phones that teach about important local topics.

There are three mobile game apps so far.

In January 2015, PBS debuted another Half the Sky program.

This one is called "A Path Appears."

Wanna join the movement?

You can keep up with Half the Sky Movement on their website, through PBS or via Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr, or Google+. And please share this with your friends who'll want to know about all the excitement.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.