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Health

Verdant Tea: a simple and delicious choice straight from the farm to your home​

This new model gives clean, organic, sustainable farming practices an opportunity to flourish.

Verdant Tea: a simple and delicious choice straight from the farm to your home​

Verdant Tea has a simple tea challenge: take tea leaves, put them in your favorite mug, pour in hot water and enjoy. No steep-timers, no scales, no worries. Just a simple love for sweet, fresh, aromatic tea leaves. Ones with complex flavors and aftertastes. Seems like an unimaginable thing to do with the old blends that are tucked away in little mesh baggies in the back corners of your cupboard, right? That’s the Verdant Tea difference.


Verdant Tea

Verdant Tea takes a new business model and applies it to an often-outdated industry: By partnering with small farmers and skipping the middlemen, teas that have never left China before can be delivered straight to your door. This new model gives clean, organic, sustainable farming practices an opportunity to flourish.

Every batch of tea is crafted by hand. And that’s why brewing Verdant Tea is no fuss – their farmers already got all of the hard work out of the way so that all you have to do is sit back and savor the goodness that they created. With a healthy, biodiverse landscape, deliberate farming practices and dedicated craft, each of these family farmers delivers a product that’s unlike any tea on the shelves. And that’s because their teas never make it to “shelves” where they become overly dry and stale. Instead, they ship directly to your door so that you can experience and enjoy the incredible flavors of farm-fresh tea leaves.

Verdant Tea was founded in 2011 after David and Lily visited China on a research grant to collect the folklore and tradition of tea. After realizing the true taste difference of tea straight from the farm, they partnered with a tea farmer, He Qingqing, to bring her family’s teas to people all over the world.

Tea has only been growing in Laoshan for a few generations. Before tea, the He Family's farm barely produced enough crops to feed them, let alone turn a profit. But by partnering with Verdant Tea, the He Family is now able to take risks, like making Laoshan Black tea and Laoshan Oolong - teas that are now becoming internationally famous.

If you’re not sure about Black or Oolong, try tasting true Dragonwell with Mrs. Li or other teas like white jasmine and silver buds yabao. If you’re not sure how to possibly pick, don’t worry, Verdant Tea has you covered. Join their tea of the month club or order a tasting kit so you can try a little bit of everything before you decide what you like (spoiler alert: you’re going to love them all!). Their website also provides in depth descriptions of different flavor profiles so you can feel confident about your choices.

Good tea is made by good people; by farmers that have the skill, craft and commitment to what they do. It’s made by people who own their land and control their entire process with creative freedom. Verdant Tea farmers take their generational knowledge and apply it to every step of the hand-crafted processes.

But don’t just take our word for it, see for yourself and steep up a pot of tea from one of Verdant Tea's partner tea farmers today!


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