via upsdogs/Instagram

If you thought that all postal workers and dogs were mortal enemies, it turns out, they're not.

Since 2013, United Parcel Service drivers have been sharing photos of their favorite dogs they meet on their routes. Some are old friends they have known for years others are new dogs that stole their hearts.

They have a Facebook group that's open to the public as well as an instagram page. Both are run by UPS drivers themselves and not UPS corporate.


"When time permits, drivers snap a photo and send it in to UPS Dogs," the Facebook page reads. "Our followers love the photos and the stories told as we share our love of these special relationships with these lovable creatures."

The result is one of the cutest, most wholesome things you'll ever see in your life.

Here are 17 of our favorite photos from upsdogs Instagram page.

Nori delivering packages in Dayton, Ohio.



Future Service Dog Finn at the Sunnyvale Hub.


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Odilious Bartholomew (Odi B for short) from Inver Grove Heights Minnesota. Loves his UPS driver, Joe.



Driver and a puppy in Central Illinois.


Marlow from Charleston, South Carolina.


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Gunner and his favorite UPS driver.



Otis from Oregon.



Driver Melvin with new pup Tank.



Hmmm. Not so sure if both of those animals in Yelm, Washington are dogs.



Alaskan Malamute Conall eagerly awaiting his treat from Josh.



Riley in Portland, Oregon.



Oliver.



Foster the puppy in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.



Kobe and her favorite driver, Jeannette.



His name is Barley from Union Mills, North Carolina and he loves treats.



Driver Scott's friend Gracie the Goodest Girl.


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