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Family

This viral, heartfelt letter to Demi Lovato written in London's tube packs the feels.

On Tuesday, July 24, singer Demi Lovato was hospitalized in Los Angeles reportedly due to a drug overdose.

Hours after initial reports surfaced, a spokesperson for the artist released a statement saying, "Demi is awake and with her family who want to express thanks to everyone for the love, prayers, and support."

Photo by Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images.


Messages poured in from around the globe, sending Lovato well wishes and positive thoughts. One of those messages came from the London Underground — and its sentiment is radiating with fans everywhere.

The heartfelt letter, written to Lovato on a service information board in London's Underground, says what so many people are feeling right now.

The letter, which channels a few of Lovato's songs, like "Skyscraper," "Gift of a Friend," and "Tell Me You Love Me," reads in full:

"Dear Demi Lovato,

Our thoughts and prayers are with you. We are thinking of you, your family and friends, and all of your fans around the world too.

May a skyscraper of strength help you to recover. When it comes to mental health health, we all need each other; may the gift of a friend get you back on the mend. Give your heart a break, there's no need to pretend.

You don't have to say, 'tell me you love me.' Demi, we most certainly do. You are a light in this world, and through the darkness, we are praying that you shine through."





The letter was written by the group All on the Board — a London-based group that pens clever, funny, or (in this case) heartfelt notes on service boards in the city's underground transit system. Lovato's letter, the group confirms, was written on a board at North Greenwich station.

Many of Lovato's fans replied to the kindhearted sign and tweet, which has garnered more than 4,000 likes at the time of this writing. "I almost cried reading this," one Twitter user wrote. "SO BEAUTIFUL. Thank you so much."

It's telling that the world's responding to Lovato's hospitalization not only with an outpouring of love but with admiration and an acknowledgement of her strength.

Photo by Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images.

Many reactions, much like actress Lili Reinhart's, comment on what a positive difference Lovato has made simply by being open about her own struggles — whether it be drug abuse, depression, addiction, or body image issues.

Reinhart said Lovato has been "an idol to me in how she spoke so openly about mental health."

Lovato's hospitalization doesn't change the fact that she's a role model for those struggling through similar challenges. It doesn't change the fact that she's helped push critical conversations forward about mental health and self-worth in meaningful ways. And it doesn't change the fact that, for many fans around the world, she remains a hero.

Thinking of you, Demi. ♥️

This story first appeared on the author's Medium and is reprinted here with permission.

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