Miss Nigeria's reaction to Miss Jamaica being crowned Miss World has us all up in our feels
RJ Baldon/YouTube

Whether you're a fan of pageants or not, this video from this weekend's Miss World pageant will definitely make you a fan of Miss Nigeria.

At the end of the night, three women stood on stage together as finalists—Miss Nigeria, Nyekachi Douglas, Miss Jamaica, Toni-Ann Singh, and Miss Brazil, Elis Coelho. The three huddled together, waiting to hear which of them would be crowned Miss World 2019. This is the moment where you wonder how the women whose names aren't announced are going to react.


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The announcer said, "And Miss World 2019 is...Jamaica!" Then Miss Nigeria showed us exactly how a strong, confident woman reacts when a friend achieves something great. Without even a hint of disappointment that she didn't win, Douglas started jumping up and down doing a happy dance around the visually stunned Singh. She appeared to shout something along the lines of "YAASSS, GIRL!!!" before embracing Singh and Coelho in a big group hug. And the celebration didn't stop.

Watch:

MISS NIGERIA'S REACTION IS PRICELESS | MISS WORLD 2019 www.youtube.com

Douglas's enthusiastic response won the hearts of the internet, prompting women everywhere to sing her praises. We all need a Miss Nigeria in our corner, cheering us on no matter what.

Not only do we all need a Miss Nigeria in our lives, but we should all strive to be like her as well.

With Jamaica winning Miss World, five major pageant titles are now held by black women, including Miss America, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, and Miss Universe. Considering the fact that official rules of the Miss America pageant originally specified that "contestants must be of good health and of the white race," (Yes, really.) that's a big deal.

RELATED: For the first time in history, the winners of top four beauty pageants are black women

Despite technically competing with one another, pageant contestants often build strong bonds with one another during their time together. In a live video taken after the awards, Douglas shared how Singh had been everyone else's cheerleader during the whole process and how genuinely happy she was that Singh had won.

Unwaveringly supportive friends like Miss Nigeria are golden. May we know them. May we be them.

Photo courtesy of Capital One
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