Miss Nigeria's reaction to Miss Jamaica being crowned Miss World has us all up in our feels
RJ Baldon/YouTube

Whether you're a fan of pageants or not, this video from this weekend's Miss World pageant will definitely make you a fan of Miss Nigeria.

At the end of the night, three women stood on stage together as finalists—Miss Nigeria, Nyekachi Douglas, Miss Jamaica, Toni-Ann Singh, and Miss Brazil, Elis Coelho. The three huddled together, waiting to hear which of them would be crowned Miss World 2019. This is the moment where you wonder how the women whose names aren't announced are going to react.


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The announcer said, "And Miss World 2019 is...Jamaica!" Then Miss Nigeria showed us exactly how a strong, confident woman reacts when a friend achieves something great. Without even a hint of disappointment that she didn't win, Douglas started jumping up and down doing a happy dance around the visually stunned Singh. She appeared to shout something along the lines of "YAASSS, GIRL!!!" before embracing Singh and Coelho in a big group hug. And the celebration didn't stop.

Watch:

MISS NIGERIA'S REACTION IS PRICELESS | MISS WORLD 2019 www.youtube.com

Douglas's enthusiastic response won the hearts of the internet, prompting women everywhere to sing her praises. We all need a Miss Nigeria in our corner, cheering us on no matter what.

Not only do we all need a Miss Nigeria in our lives, but we should all strive to be like her as well.

With Jamaica winning Miss World, five major pageant titles are now held by black women, including Miss America, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, and Miss Universe. Considering the fact that official rules of the Miss America pageant originally specified that "contestants must be of good health and of the white race," (Yes, really.) that's a big deal.

RELATED: For the first time in history, the winners of top four beauty pageants are black women

Despite technically competing with one another, pageant contestants often build strong bonds with one another during their time together. In a live video taken after the awards, Douglas shared how Singh had been everyone else's cheerleader during the whole process and how genuinely happy she was that Singh had won.

Unwaveringly supportive friends like Miss Nigeria are golden. May we know them. May we be them.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.