Martin is an 86-year-old gay man from the U.K. — who came out at age 85.

For all those years, he hid a big part of who he truly was. "It's tough being an outsider," he explained, sitting alone in his dimly lit apartment.

Now, he deeply regrets waiting so long to come out. "I missed the boat in regards to finding a lovely partner — a soulmate that I could love, live with."


GIF via 5 Gum/YouTube.

In a tear-jerking new ad video for 5 Gum, Martin encouraged young LGBTQ people to live out and proud now — not later.

"Go ahead, do it," he advised softly. "You've got it. You owe it to yourself."

But, as you'll see in the video, a few young LGBTQ people had surprise messages for Martin too (story continues below):

"Your story inspired me to be true to myself and to be proud of who I am," one young person explained to Martin in a video message.

"[Martin's story] made me very happy to be in the place that I am now," another young person, sitting alongside their partner, explained. "It made me realize how lucky we both are to be where we are right now."

GIF via 5 Gum/YouTube.

One young man inspired by Martin even came out to his father, recorded the interaction, and sent it to the 86-year-old.

"It must have taken a lot of courage," Martin explains in an email to Upworthy. "Now he can be a much happier guy!"

Martin's story and the video responses from young LGBTQ people were completely genuine and did not involve actors, 5 Gum confirmed to Upworthy.

While Martin may wish he had come out sooner, he's now living freer than he's ever been. And that's worth celebrating.

He recently went to his first Pride parade, for instance and says it was "a marvelous experience."

GIF via 5 Gum/YouTube.

"I danced all along waving my little flag and connected to thank all our supporters who got up early," Martin says. "Lots of hugs and kisses all the way to thank them."

Happy Pride, Martin. 🌈

Just to note: Upworthy and 5 Gum do not have a business partnership. We just love cute, important videos. That's all.

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


Remember those beloved Richard Scarry books from when you were a kid?

Like a lot of people, I grew up reading them. And now, I read them to my kids.

The best!

If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

Image via

Scarry was an incredibly prolific children's author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.

But here's something you may not have known about these classics: They've been slowly changing over the years.

Don't panic! They've been changing in a good way.

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Photo by Maxim Hopman on Unsplash

The Sam Vimes "Boots" Theory of Socioeconomic Unfairness explains one way the rich get richer.

Any time conversations about wealth and poverty come up, people inevitably start talking about boots.

The standard phrase that comes up is "pull yourself up by your bootstraps," which is usually shorthand for "work harder and don't ask for or expect help." (The fact that the phrase was originally used sarcastically because pulling oneself up by one's bootstraps is literally, physically impossible is rarely acknowledged, but c'est la vie.) The idea that people who build wealth do so because they individually work harder than poor people is baked into the American consciousness and wrapped up in the ideal of the American dream.

A different take on boots and building wealth, however, paints a more accurate picture of what it takes to get out of poverty.

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"Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937) and actor Peter Dinklage.

On Tuesday, Upworthy reported that actor Peter Dinklage was unhappy with Disney’s decision to move forward with a live-action version of “Snow White and the Seven Drawfs” starring Rachel Zegler.

Dinklage praised Disney’s inclusive casting of the “West Side Story” actress, whose mother is of Colombian descent, but pointed out that, at the same time, the company was making a film that promotes damaging stereotypes about people with dwarfism.

"There's a lot of hypocrisy going on, I've gotta say, from being somebody who's a little bit unique," Dinklage told Marc Maron on his “WTF” podcast.

"Well, you know, it's really progressive to cast a—literally no offense to anybody, but I was a little taken aback by, they were very proud to cast a Latino actress as Snow White," Dinklage said, "but you're still telling the story of 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Take a step back and look at what you're doing there.”

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