More

They Gave Her A Standing Ovation Before She Started Talking Because They Do What She Says At The End

I desperately wish we could call her experience a one-off fluke. But we can't. Female game developers, journalists, and players are routinely harassed, defamed, and threatened with bodily harm just for being women in an industry that isn't used to having them around. The Internet is not a safe place for them. And here are some of the ways their reputations, credibility, and sometimes careers are being attacked online.If you're in a rush, start at 14:25 to hear her theory on why this phenomenon exists. But trust me, if you start at the beginning, you might find yourself picking your jaw up off the floor at 3:22 when she shows some examples of the kind of harassment she faces. (If you pause to read, beware of graphic imagery and profanity.) But it's not just harsh words and mean pictures. At 8:55, she touches on some of the conspiracy theories that are following her around. I won't blame you if you have a facepalm moment when she talks about the "whitewashing" conspiracy. But the saddest part is at 12:35. There's no conspiracy there. Just a "shocking inability to show empathy."

They Gave Her A Standing Ovation Before She Started Talking Because They Do What She Says At The End

If you think this kind of behavior is 100% unacceptable, let people know by sharing this video.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.