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They Gave Her A Standing Ovation Before She Started Talking Because They Do What She Says At The End

I desperately wish we could call her experience a one-off fluke. But we can't. Female game developers, journalists, and players are routinely harassed, defamed, and threatened with bodily harm just for being women in an industry that isn't used to having them around. The Internet is not a safe place for them. And here are some of the ways their reputations, credibility, and sometimes careers are being attacked online.If you're in a rush, start at 14:25 to hear her theory on why this phenomenon exists. But trust me, if you start at the beginning, you might find yourself picking your jaw up off the floor at 3:22 when she shows some examples of the kind of harassment she faces. (If you pause to read, beware of graphic imagery and profanity.) But it's not just harsh words and mean pictures. At 8:55, she touches on some of the conspiracy theories that are following her around. I won't blame you if you have a facepalm moment when she talks about the "whitewashing" conspiracy. But the saddest part is at 12:35. There's no conspiracy there. Just a "shocking inability to show empathy."

If you think this kind of behavior is 100% unacceptable, let people know by sharing this video.

It is safe to say that the wise words of Muhammad Ali stands the test of time. Widely considered to be the greatest heavyweight boxer the world has ever seen, the legacy of Ali extends far beyond his pugilistic endeavors. Throughout his career, he spoke out about racial issues and injustices. The brash Mohammed Ali (or who we once knew as Cassius Clay) was always on point with his charismatic rhetoric— despite being considered arrogant at times. Even so, he had a perspective that was difficult to argue with.

As a massive boxing fan—and a huge Ali fan—I have never seen him more calm and to the point then in this recently posted BBC video from 1971. Although Ali died in 2016, at 74 years old, his courage inside and outside the ring is legendary. In this excerpt, Ali explained to Michael Parkinson about how he used to ask his mother about white representation. Even though the interview is nearly 50 years old, it shows exactly how far we need to come as a country on the issues of racial inclusion and equality.


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