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These 18 stunning photos prove natural light is the best thing on Earth.

Take a trip to the foggy Netherlands with these incredible Instagrams.

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Earth Day

We don't think about it very often, but natural sunlight is all kinds of awesome.

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.


Famous Dutch nature Instagrammer Vincent Croce knows a thing or two about the amazing benefits of natural light.

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

The dad of two spends a lot of time in the great outdoors with his camera, but he says his best photography tool isn't hardware; it's the natural light that shines almost constantly in the Netherlands. In fact, he prefers to photograph landscapes when most people are still sleeping.

"I love the quietness and peace the forest brings to me," Croce says. "In my opinion, photos are like souvenirs representing precious moments."

Croce's stunning photos remind us of just how lucky we are to live on such a beautiful planet.

Here are some of my favorites:

1. A web so beautiful, even Charlotte would be proud

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

This is what the September sun looks like in the Netherlands, according to Croce.

"I'm always looking for an interesting foreground when taking shots with my wide-angle lens," he says. "These spiderwebs in the middle of the meadow were just about perfect."

2. This complacently mysterious cow

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

"I was at the right place, at the right time," he says. "Foggy weather has the ability to make even a random cow look interesting."

3. An alluring forest scene

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

Croce took this shot of the Haagse Bos Forest during what he calls "the magic hour."

"I love the morning glow that sometimes occurs the morning after rainy weather," he says. "It really adds mood to the forest."

4. A glowing pathway

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

"This is a road that is perfectly aligned for potential sun beams," Croce says. "I occasionally check it out on my commute to my work."

5. This sprawling and frozen ocean scene

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

Utakleiv Beach has been called the most romantic beach in Europe. In the bottom lefthand corner of this photo, Croce says to look for the famous "eye of Utakleiv."

6. A gorgeous fall foliage shot

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

"This is Twickel canal in all its autumn glory," Croce says. "Twickel estate is full of woodland, heather, swamps, and gardens in the eastern part of the Netherlands."

7. An incredible, foggy sun

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

8. This cottage in the woods

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

Croce shot this picture of a historical farm in the Twente, an area located in the eastern part of The Netherlands.

9. An endless mist

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

"This is a typical Dutch scene," Croce says. "You can find lots of perfectly symmetric tree alleys spread across the rural areas of The Netherlands. In my opinion, the bicycle finished it off."

10. This photo is just pure magic

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

This old watermill, in Twickel, looks even more beautiful with fog obscuring the natural light.

11. Again with the incredible foliage

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

"Always consider the leading lines when doing landscape photography," Croce recommends.

This is a classic scene for him: the disappearing road. Again, Croce says the fog is "adding the juice" to the photo.

12. A stunning sunset

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission, taken near the German border.

13. A make-you-wanna-hike moment, captured

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

"Like many landscape photographers, I consider autumn to be my favorite season," Croce says. "This was shot in Lochem, hometown of one of my favorite photographers, Lars van de Goor."

14. Long, muddy, misty paths

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

15. Frozen landscapes

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

These are traditional red cabins, seen in the fishing village of Hamnøy and captured during Croce's recent trip to Lofoten, Norway.

16. A moment without light

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

Croce says this moment, on a glow-y forest road, was inspired by horror movies such as "The Ring."

17. A moment of loneliness

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

Croce captures a Scottish Highland cattle in this photo. These cattle are semi-wild, released to graze the nature reservations in the Netherlands.

18. And finally, a moment of epic sunlight

Image by Vincent Croce, used with permission.

This Earth of ours is pretty awesome. So what are you waiting for?

The best part of Croce's Instagrams is that they're mostly about taking advantage of the tools that are already available right outside your door: natural light and crazy cool landscapes — no special photography equipment required.

Get out there and enjoy the nature around you!

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