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The Recent Bombing In America That You Probably Didn't Hear About On The News

I want to help you get the news about domestic terrorism happening in the USA without having to spend hours on Twitter. So here ya go.

The Recent Bombing In America That You Probably Didn't Hear About On The News

The NAACP, whose members are not strangers to violence, was attacked by a domestic terrorist at a Colorado chapter on Jan. 6, 2015. No one was injured. The gas can on the explosive didn't ignite.

Here are some tweets that I think give some important commentary on the incident.


The Southern Poverty Law Center has one historical perspective about the incident.

Rep. John Lewis, who was beaten nearly to death during a march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in the '60s, was reminded of something.

Questlove, of The Roots and "Late Night With Jimmy Fallon," joins the Twitter "WTF, news?" questioning with a knowing shrug.

Rashida Jones, with some emotional leadership and a *news article.*

Jose Antonio Vargas, famous for his own civil rights fight for immigrants, calls it as he sees it: domestic terrorism in the USA.

YouTube star Laci Green on the damage that the bombing is doing to humans and to our country, even though no one was physically injured.

If you want in-depth explanations and perspectives, these members of the media are speaking way the heck up. If you haven't heard 'em, maybe you're not hearing them:

  • Elon James White, independent media aficionado and host, AMAZING at Twitter.
  • Orlando Jones, an actor you might recognize from TV's "Sleepy Hollow."
  • Derrick Clifton, reporter for Mic.com.
  • Erica Tazel, television star of FX's "Justified," brings it all home by reminding us of the big picture.

This is just a start to the coverage. If you're interested in sifting through, Twitter's #NAACPBombing hashtag has you covered.

Living a simple and happy life, Chow Yun-fat plans to give his around $700 million fortune to charity, Hong Kong movie site Jayne Stars reported.

Chow Yun Fat was born in Lamma Island, Hong Kong, to a mother who was a cleaning lady and vegetable farmer, and a father who worked on a Shell Oil Company tanker. Chow grew up in a farming community, in a house with no electricity.

He would wake at dawn each morning to help his mother sell herbal jelly and Hakka tea-pudding on the streets; in the afternoons, he went to work in the fields.

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