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Parkland school shooting survivors and founders of March For Our Lives have been awarded the International Children’s Peace Prize.

After a gunman shot and killed 17 students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida last February, a group of survivors—part of a generation of kids who spent their childhoods doing active shooter drills in their classrooms—decided enough was enough. They took advantage of the microphones being thrust in their faces and used their voices to start a movement that has taken off like no other gun legislation campaign ever has.

These students are now being recognized on the world stage for their ongoing work to end gun violence. On November 20, anti-apartheid activist and renowned cleric Archbishop Desmond Tutu presented the Parkland teens’ organization, March For Our Lives, with the International Children’s Peace Prize in Cape Town, South Africa. The prize from the KidsRights Foundation is “awarded annually to a child who fights courageously for children’s rights. All winners have shown a remarkable commitment to combating problems millions of children face worldwide.”


Desmond Tutu called the students “true change-makers.”

“The peaceful campaign to demand safe schools and communities, and the eradication of gun violence, is reminiscent of other great peace movements in history,” Tutu said. “I am in awe of these children, whose powerful message is amplified by their youthful energy and an unshakable belief that children can—no, must—improve their own futures.”

It’s an inspiring yet sad commentary, as theoretically adults should be the ones improving the future for children. However, since American grown-ups have spent decades proving they won’t take meaningful legislative action to curb gun violence, kids have been left with no choice but to take it on themselves. And take it on they have.

March For Our Lives released a statement that reflects the students’ commitment and laser sharp focus on the issue: “We are truly humbled and grateful for this award, but know that our work will not stop until we end the appalling and preventable epidemic of gun violence in the United States.”

Emma Gonzáles, David Hogg, Jaclyn Corin, and brothers Matt and Ryan Deitsch, who have helped serve as the public faces of March For Our Lives, received the award in Cape Town. More than 100 children from around the world were nominated for the prize, previous recipients of which include Malala Yousafsai, the Pakistani youth who refused to stop speaking out for education even after being shot in the face.

The Parkland activists haven’t slowed down since the shooting.

The Parkland students organized March for Our Lives, a demonstration that drew hundreds of thousands of people to Washington, D.C. on March 24, 2018, and spurred hundreds of sister events around the world. MFOL has since evolved into an advocacy organization that pushes for lawmakers to stand up to the gun lobby, fund gun violence research, eliminate restrictions on the ATF, and pass various common sense gun legislation.

This summer, the students organized the Road to Change campaign, visiting communities in more than 20 states to help register young voters and spread the message that it's time to take action—legislatively and culturally—to end America's gun violence problem. They also pushed for youth turnout for the 2018 midterms with their #TurnoutTuesday series.

The Parkland survivors are on a serious mission to save lives, and they're clearly not going to stop until that missions is accomplished.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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