Heroes

The Most Hilarious Sex Education Video Narrated By A Dwarf From The Hobbit I Have Ever Seen

Whether you know Richard Armitage best as Thorin Oakenshield from "The Hobbit," or as Sir Guy of Gisbourne from BBC's short-lived "Robin Hood" series, it's pretty safe to say that this incredibly amusing and informative documentary about a world of people-sized sperm would not be the same without his rich narration. This is so much better than anything your teacher ever showed you in health class.

The Most Hilarious Sex Education Video Narrated By A Dwarf From The Hobbit I Have Ever Seen

Here are some moments you don't want to miss:


  • At 0:58, meet the sperm. They make weird noises and run up a mountain. This is totally normal sperm behavior.
  • At 2:07 meet Glenn. He has a "miracle of engineering tucked away in his pants." This is totally normal human biology.
  • At 3:00 sperm is very particular. But it's fun to watch in a petri dish. This is totally normal scientific behavior.
  • At 4:00 experts answer the question, "In our people-sized sperm world, what would a testicle be like?"
  • At 7:20 did you know some sperm like to knit in their down time? Get it together, Glenn!
  • At 8:40 this is for you, history buffs: sperm entering a vagina is like the sexual equivalent of D-Day.
  • At 9:39 Glenn heroically brushes his teeth. This is weirdly normal human behavior given the intensity of that D-Day metaphor.
  • At 10:56 there is a "wet and wild high-speed ticket to oblivion."
  • At 11:30 ejaculation is pleasurable for the man, but what do sperm experience? Warning: one of the sperm in this segment looks bizarrely like Harry Potter. Another warning: there is Enya music.
  • At 13:00 this scientist reveals some of his more, er, personal specimens? This is totally normal scientific behavior.
  • At 13:36 you won't believe what old-timey scientists thought about sperm. They used to call sperm "animicules" which I think is just adorable.
  • At 15:35 DON'T EJACULATE TOO MUCH.
  • At 16:10 Glenn's sperm quest begins. This is totally normal quest-like behavior.
  • At 17:15 everything is epic. THIS is the "Lord of the Rings" of sex-ed videos.
  • At 20:30 the cervix looks pretty ominous. Then it sends down metaphorical mucus ladders. This is totally normal cervix behavior.
  • At 26:20 you learn that the better the sex, the better the chance of conception?
  • At 28:10 you might want to look away for this very visual bit about female pig orgasms.
  • At 30:38 a healthy egg from a fertile donor costs about $30,000. Remind me again why I went to college?
  • At 32:15 strippers helped evolutionary psychologists understand ovulation and attractiveness to males or something. This is mostly typical pretend social science that concludes with the result that women are more attractive to men because of ovulation and control men's reactions to them because of a connection between big boobs and smaller waists? Picture me sighing exasperatedly.
  • At 35:45 watch out, sperm, IT'S A TRAP! (admiralakbar.gif)
  • At 40:44 get to sperm heaven.
  • At 44:20 find out what sperm smells like. Science!
  • At 46:12 the sperm strip down to their underwear.
  • At 50:46 the sperm blows its head up to win the race. This is totally normal sperm behavior.
  • And finally, at 52:30, let's have a moment of silence for all the dead sperm that didn't make it.
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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.