The important reason why this New York Fashion Week collection made history.

This is Anniesa Hasibuan, an Indonesia-based fashion designer who just made history for a very cool reason.

Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows.

On Sept. 12, 2016, Hasibuan's collection rocked the runway at New York Fashion Week, and every single model was wearing a hijab.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows.


Yep, that's a first.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows.

The hijab, which is worn by many Muslim women, is a reflection of their faith.

As you can see, the designs were stunning.

Boasting 48 different looks inspired by Hasibuan's hometown of Jakarta, the collection included suits, trousers, gowns, and more, presented in various textures and colors.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows.

Judging by the audience's reaction, I'm not the only one who's loving Hasibuan's aesthetic either.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows.

As Elle reported, the show ended with Hasibuan receiving a standing ovation — a rarity at a New York Fashion Week event.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows.

"I want to bring the Indonesian name to the fashion world and use my clothes to introduce people to the different and diverse parts of Indonesia," Hasibuan explained to The Jakarta Post.

Her brand, by the way, is just one year old.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows.

Fashion may be a frivolous topic to some, but its impact on our culture goes far beyond the clothes on our backs.

Inclusivity in fashion has become more of a priority in recent years, as brands see the value in promoting body-positivity and diversity to a mass audience hungry for change. It's what customers want, so it's not just the right thing to do, it's good for business too.

It's why the fashion industry has started tracking the data on — and is generally getting better at — the diversification of models in terms of race, body size, age, and LGBTQ representation. This year, for instance, designer Christian Siriano sent several plus-size models down his runway, while brand Chromat was praised for its inclusive show, which featured people of all colors, transgender models, and Lauren Wasser, who lost a leg to toxic shock syndrome four years ago.

To be sure, a lot more improvement is needed before the fashion world truly reflects all types of people. But we're on the right track.

In recent years, we've seen brands like Melissa McCarthy's Seven7 — aimed at women sizes 4-28 — praised for promoting body positivity.

“Women come in all sizes," McCarthy said. "Seventy percent of women in the United States are a size 14 or above, and that’s technically ‘plus-size,’ so you’re taking your biggest category of people and telling them, ‘you’re not really worthy.’”

Photo by Gerardo Mora/Getty Images for HSN.

We've also seen models challenge our tired definitions of beauty, like Winnie Harlow.

“If God wanted me to be black, I’d be black, if God wanted me to be white, I’d be white," Harlow said. "But he chose for me to be both and original. So I guess that’s the way I’m supposed to be."

Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Swarovski.

And we've seen models like Danielle Sheypuk, who's taken the runway rulebook and tossed it out the window.

"I have taken it on as my job to change the negative way that society views people with disabilities, both in the areas of dating and fashion," Sheypuk told The Guardian.

Photo by Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Runway of Dreams.

She makes a great point. Because fashion can change how society sees certain groups of people.

That's why seeing hijab-wearing women rock a runway in New York City to thunderous applause is so incredible.

It's about so much more than the clothes.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for New York Fashion Week: The Shows.

True

Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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