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Education

A mom was frustrated that there weren't shows for kids with developmental delays. So, she made one herself.

Ms. Rachel has taken the internet by storm with her show geared toward educating parents and toddlers.

Mom couldn't find a show for children with developmental delays.

If there's one thing a determined parent will do, it's make sure their kid is getting their needs met. Even if that means they have to reinvent the wheel to do it. Rachel Griffin Accurso, or as parents across TikTok and YouTube know her, Ms. Rachel, found herself without any real options for additional resources to help her toddler who was diagnosed with a speech delay.

Accurso was looking for a developmentally appropriate show for her son but she wasn't having any luck. That's when she decided to take her teaching degree and get to work on creating her own show. It became a family business when she teamed up with her husband, Broadway composer Aron Accurso, who has been there every step of the way. He's even in the episodes singing along.

"Songs for Littles" has infiltrated homes across America. If you have a toddler and internet access, you've likely heard of it. The show has more than a billion views on YouTube. Yes, that's billion, with a "B." Ms. Rachel also has more than 19 million likes on TikTok and has speech pathologists everywhere singing her praises.



Accurso is intentional with all of her videos, doing close-ups on her mouth when introducing new words and pausing to "hear" responses from her viewers after asking a question. In her interview with Today, Accurso admitted, "A lot of things I teach are things I wish I had known for my son." She explained that everything she does is backed by research and is recorded in her small apartment in front of a green screen.

Parents on TikTok often upload videos thanking Accurso or showing off the skill their child learned from watching her show. The journalist who interviewed "Ms. Rachel" for Today even got to record an episode of "Songs for Littles" with her.

Check out the cute video below:


This article originally appeared on 01.10.23

Identity

Blind Masterchef champ reveals how she pulls off amazing meals by wearing a body cam

"It's like any other challenge in life; you just face it head on and hope for the best."

Image pulled from YouTube video.

Christine Ha competes on "Masterchef."

There is one question chef Christine Ha fields more than any other.

But it's got nothing to do with being a "Masterchef" champion, New York Times bestselling author, and acclaimed TV host and cooking instructor.

The question: "How do you cook while blind?"


Ha has a rare autoimmune disease that attacked her spinal cord and optic nerve. She started losing her vision in 2004 while she was in her 20s.

Ha compares her vision loss to "looking at a very foggy mirror after a hot shower." After her diagnosis, she worried she'd have to give up cooking. It was an interest she was just beginning to explore and one she had a serious talent and passion for. Instead of shying away from the kitchen, Ha decided to learn to navigate her new reality.

"It's like any other challenge in life; you just face it head on and hope for the best," she said in one of her recent videos.

blindness, chef, culinary, story, connection

Ha started losing her vision in 2004.

Image pulled from YouTube video.

A seasoned chef, Ha leans into her other senses to bring her culinary creations to life.

In a video for her YouTube channel, Ha wears a GoPro camera while expertly preparing a mouthwatering meal of steamed whole snapper with black bean sauce and blistered green beans. She describes it as a "typical weeknight meal," the very thought of which separates home cooks from Masterchefs.

Watch Christine Ha make a delicious dinner ... just maybe not while you're hungry.

Ha is patient, taking her time to feel, smell, prep, and cut ingredients.

She sometimes uses adaptive tools, but much of her cooking is done by touch. She deftly guides her knife to accomplish intricate cuts.

Just like a sous chef in a professional kitchen, sometimes Ha's partner lends a quick hand.

Ha uses cooking, food, and telling her story to connect and communicate with people around her.

Preparing and sharing meals is a great way to unite people and celebrate what makes each of us unique. Plus, you get to eat tasty food with your favorite people. And if it's Gordon Ramsay approved, it's that much sweeter.

Watch and learn a little more about Christine Ha in the video below:

This article originally appeared on 05.26.17

A grandpa shower is the best thing you've never heard of.

Becoming a grandparent is a really big deal. It's almost like a promotion of sorts, especially because grandparents get to spoil their grandkids silly and send them on their way. It's just another way to expand on the love you have for your own child, and if the baby is lucky, they'll get amazing grandparents that build a special bond with them.

Lila Chirico's dad is one of those guys who was simply born to be a grandpa. So much so that his co-workers wanted to share in his excitement of preparing for his first grandchild. His daughter is pregnant with her very first baby and the grandpa-to-be couldn't be happier.

Chirico was able to capture the adorable moment when her father's co-workers surprised him with a "grandpa shower." If you've never heard of a grandpa shower, no worries. It's something his co-workers came up with to shower the soon to be grandfather with joy and more baby items than he could imagine. His reaction was priceless.


"The ladies at my dad's work threw him a 'grandpa shower.' He's worked in the same department for over 30 years," Chirico shared via text overlay.

As he's about to round the corner to his surprise grandpa shower, you see one of his co-workers behind him jumping up and down in excitement. The granddad-to-be's face beams when he sees all of the bags and boxes of baby stuff, including a bib set that reads, "My grandpa loves me more than baseball." Chirico concludes that grandpa showers should become a thing, and I couldn't agree more.

See his reaction below: