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Trevor Noah shared the one question U.S. journalists should be asking themselves every day

"Ask yourself that question every day, because you have one of the most important roles in the world."

Trevor Noah has gotten high praise for his closing remarks at the White House Correspondents' Dinner.

For the first time in six years, the annual White House Correspondents' Dinner (WHCD) was held with the president of the United States in attendance on April 30 in Washington, D.C. The WHCD has been a tradition in Washington for more than a century and for the past several decades it has taken the form of a comedic roast of both the government and the press. This year's dinner was hosted by comedian and host of "The Daily Show" Trevor Noah, who's known for his smart, witty commentary on social and political issues.

The "let's invite a comedian to publicly and viciously make fun of us for a couple of hours" idea may be a bit odd, but these events have proven quite popular over the years, with many viral moments (including President Obama's infamous GIF-worthy mic drop) coming from them.

This year's dinner opened with Noah joking about it being a superspreader event, earning some uncomfortable laughter, then the individual roasts commenced. Noah didn't hold back slamming people across the political and media spectrum—all in good fun, of course—including President Biden himself.

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YouTube/Fox News/The Conversation

This article originally appeared on 09.30.20

`Fox News is up to five times more likely to use the word "hate" in its programming than its main competitors, according to our new study of how cable news channels use language.

Fox particularly uses the term when explaining opposition to Donald Trump. His opponents are said to "hate" Trump, his values and his followers.

Our research, which ran from Jan. 1 to May 8, 2020, initially explored news of Trump's impeachment. Then came the coronavirus. As we sifted through hundreds of cable news transcripts over five months, we noticed consistent differences between the vocabulary used on Fox News and that of MSNBC.

While their news agendas were largely similar, the words they used to describe these newsworthy events diverged greatly.

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SOURCE: KFOR

KFOR Weather Woman Emily Sutton got props from a local Mexican restaurant that was so smitten with her responses to an angry viewer that they offered her free food and margaritas for life.

If you spend enough time on social media, you quickly learn everybody has got an opinion on everything. And most people aren't afraid to voice said opinions, even if they aren't very good.

Of course one could argue there's no such thing as a "good" opinion or a "right" or "wrong" one. I'd argue that if you've got an opinion on something, it should be based on some type of evidence or logic. Perfect example: if you're trying to tell me that Ross from Friends isn't a psychopath, then you clearly haven't seen this video or heard the show without a laugh track.

And if you need an even clearer example of a bad opinion, I offer up Richard Weathers for consideration. He got on local reporter Emily Sutton's case after seeing she delivered a weather broadcast that employed the use of a Spanish translator.

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On February 19, 2020, a group of outdoor adventurists took a 25-day rafting trip down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. During the trip, they had no cell service and no contact with the outside world. When they ended they ended their journey on March 14, the man who pulled them ashore asked if they had been in touch with anyone else. When the rafters said no, the man sighed, then launched into an explanation of how the globe had been gripped by the coronavirus pandemic and everything had come to a screeching halt.

The rafters listened with bewilderment as they were told about toilet paper shortages and the NBA season being canceled and everyone being asked to stay at home. One of the river guides, who had done these kinds of off-grid excursions multiple times, said that they'd often joke about coming back to a completely different world—it had just never actually happened before.

The rafters' story was shared in the New York Times last spring, but they're not the only ones to have had such an experience.

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