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Health

6 too-real comics show what happens when work gets too heavy

Finding a good balance between working and relaxing can be difficult, but it doesn't have to be.

Image courtesy of College Humor

A reason to be late... tasty treats.


Everyone gets antsy about their jobs sometimes.

Maybe you notice you're less motivated than usual. Maybe you acknowledge that you're no longer going the extra mile, and you're not quite sure why. Maybe professionalism is a term you've long since forgotten.

For many of us, the struggle can be so, so real. That's why Willie Muse wrote these all-too-relatable comics for College Humor, illustrated by Karina Farek.


These six funny comics perfectly illustrate what a typical first day at your job looks like versus the 101st day:

1. Who doesn't look at at least one viral video a day?

music, work, employee rights, jobs

To tune or not to tune.

Image courtesy of College Humor

2. You suddenly find the time to fit in a breakfast sandwich.

breakfast, fast food, time

How do you miss out on a breakfast quickly served?

Image courtesy of College Humor

3. You go from wanting your boss's approval to hating his or her guts.

boss, employee, friendship, community

Getting to know your coworkers...

Image courtesy of College Humor

4. All the details that were once so important become nuisances.

job requirements, nuisances, work vacation

An evolution in responsibility and ethics?

Image courtesy of College Humor

5. Your (lack of) motivation can take you from hero to zero — quick!

motivation, work-life-balance, career

When an opportunity evolves into a responsibility.

Image courtesy of College Humor

6. And you most certainly DO NOT want to end up like this.

advice, labor, qualifications

Getting on the right side of fear.

Image courtesy of College Humor

Let's be real: These comics are funny, but they also aren't ideal.

In a perfect world, we'd all have jobs that still look and feel like Day 1 on Day 101. And one of the only ways to get there is to intentionally strive for a life that's full of work-life balance. We really do have the power to not let things play out like this.

What can we do?

At a most basic level, we can make sure we're getting enough sleep, eating well, and doing at least a little exercise. We also shouldn't underestimate the benefits of detaching from computer screens and smartphones every once in a while. Plus, we can also minimize our stress levels by not multitasking and instead concentrating on one task at time.

The most overlooked advice for maintaining a healthy work-life balance is to actually take time off.

Disconnect from your daily work routine. Make a conscious effort to recharge.

Perhaps if we dedicate more time to enjoying life outside of work, there's more of a chance that we'll be on Day 1 for months, feeling grateful for our jobs rather than impatiently waiting for the clock to strike 5. Let's get to it!


This article originally appeared on 10.25.16

"Man Time" is a comic about life as a trans man, by a trans man, and it's awesome.

After noodling on a few ideas for a web comic about coming out and living as a trans man, Sam, a 26-year-old designer and artist from New Jersey decided to bring a few to life. Sam himself came out as a transgender man about seven years ago.

"I had a few funny ideas one day and figured I should at least give it a try and see if anyone liked them," Sam writes in an e-mail interview.


Spoiler alert: They did.

[rebelmouse-image 19469731 dam="1" original_size="750x857" caption="All comics by Sam for "Man Time," used with permission." expand=1]All comics by Sam for "Man Time," used with permission.

The cartoons are comic relief and a welcome break from what can be a very stressful transition.

"Our families or friends might not be supportive, we might be having trouble with the medical side of transitioning, and we hear rude jokes about trans people when we least expect it," Sam writes. "All of that takes a toll on you, and it’s easy to get depressed."

That's why Sam created "Man Time" — to laugh, commiserate, and connect with other people going through the exact same thing.

"I think that one of the most important things in life is to be able to laugh," he writes. "Sharing stories and laughing together is the best way to make friends and build a community."

Sam's community has grown considerably as "Man Time" has more than 10,000 followers on Tumblr. Not bad for its first nine months.

Laugh along and get some insight into the lives of a few trans men through Sam's characters in five more of his favorite pieces.

1. Coming out can be nerve-wracking,  especially to friends and family.

2. Though sometimes, it seems like they knew all along.

3. Transitioning isn't something that happens overnight. There's often a new name and pronouns.

4. And sometimes new hormones too.

5. But each change, medical or not, takes serious courage.

While "Man Time" may focus on the experiences of trans men, everyone can appreciate its sincerity, heart, and humor.

Supporting, reading, listening to, and watching content by transgender creators is a good way to get a greater understanding of what it's like to be trans. It's also one of the many ways you can stand with trans and non-binary people during what's been a really scary and challenging time.

So as Sam suggests, take a minute to laugh. What better way to connect, build community, and celebrate our diversity and our common ground?

Note: Sam requested not to use his last name in this piece, and we obliged. We respect his privacy and thank him for sharing his work with us.

Everyone seems to be clicking "send" a bit too early nowadays.

We officially live in a world where internet trigger-happy world leaders can send massive populations into a devolved tail spin with erratic tweets, posts, and subsequent responses. These posts can have far-reaching consequences, and in the haste to respond in kind we've forgotten that we've normalized this kind of attitude.

Boulet is a French comic artist who has been writing about this for 15 years.

Originally he started writing an autobiographical series, but when he realized how accessible it was to his readers, he decided to make it fictional. "So it's mostly 'drawn stand up comedy,'" he explains. "I'm the main character, but in the same way comedians are there own character when they are on stage. The purpose is not really to talk about me but about situations of everyday's life everyone can relate to."


In his words, "The comic (below) was an anecdote about a Facebook mistake, I had basically two choices: Use it as a Facebook status to make my friends laugh or try to dramatize the whole process into an internal crisis to make it a story."

Comic by Bouletcorp, where it originally appeared. Used here with permission.

‌‌‌‌‌‌‌That "internal crisis" is something Boulet is very interested in.

Boulet enjoys using the accessible medium of cartoons as a way to explore complex issues. He loves learning about and studying consciousness and neuroscience. His fans enjoy this.

"There were fun discussions in the comments about how the brain works ... the very idea that we have a parallel process that can interfere, overlap or get in conflict is actually a thing. What I found most intriguing about this story was to literally feel my hand freeze BEFORE I could put an explanation on the WHY it froze."

He also had a great suggestion as to figuring out the motivations behind certain posts. "We should always go on social networks with EEGs on. We would learn a lot."

After what we've seen on social media over the last few years, it's hard to disagree.