+
Joy

Clever comic perfectly illustrates what makes a work environment a healthy one

If it’s not just for the money, what do we look for in a job?

why people are quitting their jobs
All images via thewokesalaryman

Millions of Americans are quitting their jobs in search of something better

Blame it on the pandemic, the Great Resignation or simply the ever-changing times, but the way we view work is quite different now than it used to be. Employees are striving for more work-life balance, four-day work weeks, union protection… In short, it’s no longer just about the daily hustle and grind. People are starting to redefine what work means to them beyond the paycheck.

But if it’s not just for the money, what do we look for in a job?

A comic strip titled “Why people leave even the most high paying jobs” by Woke Salaryman does a great job of answering that question.

The illustrations begin with two co-workers talking. One of them is packing up his things after taking on a new job that would involve a paycut. The other is in disbelief. Sure, the workplace is toxic, but at least it pays well.

things to look for in a job besides money A paycut? What madness is this?!All images from wokesalaryman.com

It’s here that the enlightened exiting co-worker states, “Money is not the ONLY thing that matters in a job.” Here are other things to consider:


1. Culture

work life balance

Looks for work cultures that are collaborative and transparent, rather than competitive and secretive.

Even in the work-from-home age, culture is a major factor for workplace fulfillment. How your boss interacts with you, whether or not you receive credit or support and who you get to learn from all make an impact. Woke Salaryman suggests to look for these two types of healthy company cultures:

Collaborative, where there’s an even exchange of trust, accountability, credit and responsibility. No more micromanagement, gossip or working in silos. Of course, you can work independently and still be collaborative, but I don’t believe the author was trying to dissuade anyone from that. The point is, a collaborative culture instills a sense of safety, rather than fear.

Transparent, where information is freely and honestly exchanged between colleagues and departments. An example of this could look like a visible salary description on a job post or being able to express feedback to the company without fear of retribution.

2. Meaning

what to look for in a job besides money

Some people are passion oriented, others are purpose oriented. Both are valid.

As the comic points out, most of us will spend the majority of our waking lives working. So it helps a lot if what we do feels meaningful. Some are more driven by inner passion, others might be motivated by a sense of purpose to better the world. Neither are necessarily better or worse than the other. But it does help to know your own motivations in order to shape a life (and job) that reflects them.

However, though meaning is important, it’s not necessarily required—or even possible at times—to get that from work. Having a job purely for the sake of income is OK too. Some people have no problem compartmentalizing themselves in a healthy way, deriving meaning from their family, their hobbies or other activities outside of work (to these people I humbly ask … please show me your ways). Hopefully the job at least provides support and space to pursue those interests.

3. Opportunities for growth

woke salaryman comic, why people leave high paying jobs woke salaryman

Networking and perspective, two often overlooked growth opportunities.

Woke Salaryman suggests that people usually define growth as either acquiring new skills or responsibilities, which overlooks network and perspective.

Networking at a good company offers the chance to find quality mentors, clients and partners, all of which can lead to future opportunities.

Perspective is equally vital as the world becomes more connected. The open-mindedness gained through being exposed to new perspectives can help someone become more empathetic, collaborative and versatile … rather than simply tech savvy.

4. Money isn't everything

healthy work culture

Money is a valuable resource, but not the only one.

Of course, the caveat to all this privilege: Though these choices are certainly aspirational, they are not exactly accessible to everyone. Furthermore, money might not be the only reason to choose a job, but it does play a major role in our lives. What the comic is really preaching is to ask ourselves, “What will help me achieve a life well lived?” When we ask ourselves this simple question, money no longer becomes the ultimate or only resource.

If you would like to take a look at the full comic strip, you can check out Woke Salaryman’s website here.

Health

A child’s mental health concerns shouldn’t be publicized no matter who their parents are

Even politicians' children deserve privacy during a mental health crisis.

A child's mental health concerns shouldn't be publicized.

Editor's Note: If you are having thoughts about taking your own life, or know of anyone who is in need of help, the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline is a United States-based suicide prevention network of over 200+ crisis centers that provides 24/7 service via a toll-free hotline with the number 9-8-8. It is available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress.


It's an unspoken rule that children of politicians should be off limits when it comes to public figure status. Kids deserve the ability to simply be kids without the media picking them apart. We saw this during Obama's presidency when people from both ends of the political spectrum come out to defend Malia and Sasha Obama's privacy and again when a reporter made a remark about Barron Trump.

This is even more important when we are talking about a child's mental health, so seeing detailed reports about Ted Cruz's 14-year-old child's private mental health crisis was offputting, to say it kindly. It feels icky for me to even put the senator's name in this article because it feels like adding to this child's exposure.

When a child is struggling with mental health concerns, the instinct should be to cocoon them in safety, not to highlight the details or speculate on the cause. Ever since the news broke about this child's mental health, social media has been abuzz, mostly attacking the parents and speculating if the child is a member of the LGBTQ community.

Keep ReadingShow less

Famous writers shared their book signing woes with a disheartened new author.

Putting creative work out into the world to be evaluated and judged is nerve-wracking enough as it is. Having to market your work, especially if you're not particularly extroverted or sales-minded, is even worse.

So when you're a newly published author holding a book signing and only two of the dozens of people who RSVP'd show up, it's disheartening if not devastating. No matter how much you tell yourself "people are just busy," it feels like a rejection of you and your work.

Debut novelist Chelsea Banning recently experienced this scenario firsthand, and her sharing it led to an amazing deluge of support and solidarity—not only from other aspiring authors, but from some of the top names in the writing business.

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 04.15.19


On May 28, 2014, 13-year-old Athena Orchard of Leicester, England, died of bone cancer. The disease began as a tumor in her head and eventually spread to her spine and left shoulder. After her passing, Athena's parents and six siblings were completely devastated. In the days following her death, her father, Dean, had the difficult task of going through her belongings. But the spirits of the entire Orchard family got a huge boost when he uncovered a secret message written by Athena on the backside of a full-length mirror.

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 01.22.19


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn't have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women's rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn't something we'd choose—and we'd hope others wouldn't choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

Keep ReadingShow less