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Joy

Clever comic perfectly illustrates what makes a work environment a healthy one

If it’s not just for the money, what do we look for in a job?

why people are quitting their jobs
All images via thewokesalaryman

Millions of Americans are quitting their jobs in search of something better

Blame it on the pandemic, the Great Resignation or simply the ever-changing times, but the way we view work is quite different now than it used to be. Employees are striving for more work-life balance, four-day work weeks, union protection… In short, it’s no longer just about the daily hustle and grind. People are starting to redefine what work means to them beyond the paycheck.

But if it’s not just for the money, what do we look for in a job?

A comic strip titled “Why people leave even the most high paying jobs” by Woke Salaryman does a great job of answering that question.

The illustrations begin with two co-workers talking. One of them is packing up his things after taking on a new job that would involve a paycut. The other is in disbelief. Sure, the workplace is toxic, but at least it pays well.

things to look for in a job besides money A paycut? What madness is this?!All images from wokesalaryman.com

It’s here that the enlightened exiting co-worker states, “Money is not the ONLY thing that matters in a job.” Here are other things to consider:


1. Culture

work life balance

Looks for work cultures that are collaborative and transparent, rather than competitive and secretive.

Even in the work-from-home age, culture is a major factor for workplace fulfillment. How your boss interacts with you, whether or not you receive credit or support and who you get to learn from all make an impact. Woke Salaryman suggests to look for these two types of healthy company cultures:

Collaborative, where there’s an even exchange of trust, accountability, credit and responsibility. No more micromanagement, gossip or working in silos. Of course, you can work independently and still be collaborative, but I don’t believe the author was trying to dissuade anyone from that. The point is, a collaborative culture instills a sense of safety, rather than fear.

Transparent, where information is freely and honestly exchanged between colleagues and departments. An example of this could look like a visible salary description on a job post or being able to express feedback to the company without fear of retribution.

2. Meaning

what to look for in a job besides money

Some people are passion oriented, others are purpose oriented. Both are valid.

As the comic points out, most of us will spend the majority of our waking lives working. So it helps a lot if what we do feels meaningful. Some are more driven by inner passion, others might be motivated by a sense of purpose to better the world. Neither are necessarily better or worse than the other. But it does help to know your own motivations in order to shape a life (and job) that reflects them.

However, though meaning is important, it’s not necessarily required—or even possible at times—to get that from work. Having a job purely for the sake of income is OK too. Some people have no problem compartmentalizing themselves in a healthy way, deriving meaning from their family, their hobbies or other activities outside of work (to these people I humbly ask … please show me your ways). Hopefully the job at least provides support and space to pursue those interests.

3. Opportunities for growth

woke salaryman comic, why people leave high paying jobs woke salaryman

Networking and perspective, two often overlooked growth opportunities.

Woke Salaryman suggests that people usually define growth as either acquiring new skills or responsibilities, which overlooks network and perspective.

Networking at a good company offers the chance to find quality mentors, clients and partners, all of which can lead to future opportunities.

Perspective is equally vital as the world becomes more connected. The open-mindedness gained through being exposed to new perspectives can help someone become more empathetic, collaborative and versatile … rather than simply tech savvy.

4. Money isn't everything

healthy work culture

Money is a valuable resource, but not the only one.

Of course, the caveat to all this privilege: Though these choices are certainly aspirational, they are not exactly accessible to everyone. Furthermore, money might not be the only reason to choose a job, but it does play a major role in our lives. What the comic is really preaching is to ask ourselves, “What will help me achieve a life well lived?” When we ask ourselves this simple question, money no longer becomes the ultimate or only resource.

If you would like to take a look at the full comic strip, you can check out Woke Salaryman’s website here.

Joy

1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.

This article originally appeared on 08.21.18


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