*trigger warning: this post alludes to sensitive, racist content.

A disturbing video starring University of Georgia fraternity members went viral last week, reopening an important discussion about racism and inclusivity.

“Pick my cotton, b****!” a seemingly intoxicated University of Georgia college coed jeers, while hitting one of his pals laying under the covers in a bed. The group laughs hysterically as the phrase is repeated more than once. “You aren’t using the right words," chides one of the boys, to which the ring leader excitedly responds “Pick my cotton, nig***!”

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Seth Owen's dream was to go to college. But after his parents kicked him out for being gay, it felt like he'd never achieve it.

The 18-year-old, who was valedictorian of his graduating class, was all set for the future. With a GPA of 4.16 and an acceptance to his first-choice college — Georgetown — he thought his life had been made.

But Owen's parents — strict Southern Baptists — made him leave home when he refused to go to church or continue any type of conversion treatment. Without his parents' help, he wouldn't be able to afford to go to school.

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College move-in week is an exciting time in parents' and students' lives — but it doesn't come cheap.

We've all heard about the rising cost of college tuition, and anyone who's purchased a college textbook knows how financially daunting higher education can be.

But there are other costs that often get lost in the discussion — things that many Americans may take for granted, but are a significant challenge for others. Dorm living requires some basics that some students struggle to afford. Considering the fact that the average family spends close to $1000 on college back-to-school items, kids who are coming from disadvantaged communities or are the first in their families to go to college may not be prepared for the cost of moving in to their dorm rooms.

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Greek life might be an old tradition in college campuses across the country, but a new dawn is emerging for one sorority in Texas.

Mu Delta Alpha is perhaps the only active Muslim sorority in the United States and the first to be established in Texas. It was founded in 2016 at the University of Texas at Dallas by Samira Maddox. Within a year, it opened a beta chapter at the University of Texas at Austin, and it has seen tremendous interest and growth since then.

Another Muslim sorority, Gamma Gamma Chi, had started to organize in 2005 in Virginia and Georgia, but the creation now of Mu Delta Alpha seems to have taken a quick hold. The beta chapter, which has a purpose of empowering women through professional development, received more than 100 pledges and inducted 10 new members in 2017.

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