If you've heard that Canada's health system is an example of socialist failure, where wait times are outrageous and people swarm to the U.S. to get the healthcare they really need, you can probably thank Wendell Potter for that.

Potter spent two decades working in the health insurance industry, first for Humana, and then for Cigna. He was head of corporate communications for the latter when he had a crisis of conscience in 2008 and quit. Since then, he has been on a mission to revamp the healthcare system in the U.S. He has also served as a whistleblower, exposing behind-the-scenes corruption and manipulation in the health insurance industry.

Which brings us to Canada.

Potter posted a thread on Twitter this week explaining how he had personally been a part of the push to make Canada's system look bad so that Americans would think our system was superior.

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When I found out I was pregnant in October 2018, I had planned to keep the news a secret from family for a little while — but my phone seemed to have other ideas.

Within just a few hours of finding out the news, I was being bombarded with ads for baby gear, baby clothes and diapers on Facebook, Instagram and pretty much any other site I visited — be it my phone or on my computer.

Good thing my family wasn't looking over my shoulder while I was on my phone or my secret would have been ruined.

I'm certainly not alone in feeling like online ads can read your mind.

When I started asking around, it seemed like everyone had their own similar story: Brian Kelleher told me that when he and his wife met, they started getting ads for wedding rings and bridal shops within just a few weeks. Tech blogger Snezhina Piskov told me that she started getting ads for pocket projectors after discussing them in Messenger with her colleagues. Meanwhile Lauren Foley, a writer, told me she started getting ads for Happy Socks after seeing one of their shops when she got off the bus one day.

When online advertising seems to know us this well, it begs the question: are our phones listening to us?

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