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Canada's prime minister on the importance of raising feminist sons.

The Canadian prime minister joins a growing chorus of men fighting for gender parity.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau believes in gender equality.

Last year, when asked why he made a point of selecting a "gender-balanced" cabinet, he replied with a shrug and a simple line: "Because it's 2015."


GIF from CBC.

He recently touched on another important gender-related topic: men's role in supporting feminism.

On the Progress Towards Parity panel during the World Economic Forum's annual meeting this year in Davos, Switzerland, Trudeau shared an important story about how he's raising his own children.

He'd taken special care to raise his daughter in a way that allows her to feel empowered and confident, but it wasn't until his wife, Sophie, said something to him that he realized how important it is to take the same care raising his 8- and 2-year-old sons to be just as aware of gender issues.

GIFs from World Economic Forum.

Because an equal society is one in which we're all working to break down walls of oppression.

And that absolutely includes men's role in acknowledging their own position in the world and how they can use that privilege to dismantle society's patriarchal structure.

Now, fighting for gender equality already has a name: feminism. And as the prime minister is quick to say, it's not a word we need to be afraid of.


Prominent men around the world are joining the fight for gender equality.

In 2014, President Barack Obama famously said, "If you're a strong man, you should not feel threatened by strong women," in response to a question about gender-based violence, adding, "All the men here have to be just as committed to empowering women as the women are."

Obama poses with Girl Scouts/superheroes during the 2015 White House Science Fair. Photo by Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images.

Last year, New York Magazine asked 15 male celebrities whether they consider themselves feminists. The answers were pretty encouraging.

"Oh, absolutely," said Matt McGorry of "Orange Is the New Black" and "How to Get Away With Murder." "Ultimately, if there were as many male feminists as there are female feminists, we wouldn’t need to be fighting for equality."

"Yeah, because I like women and I respect women," responded Harrison Ford.


Photo by Ian Gavan/Getty Images.

The good news is that things are getting better.

The bad news is that progress is still going way too slowly.

If we continue at the current pace, gender equality — in terms of economic, social, and legal aspects — won't be achieved until 2133. That's way too long to wait, which is why it's more important than ever that people of all genders, and especially men in positions of power, help support and create a level playing field where people of all genders can thrive.

Interested in more gender equality awesomeness? Check out the full video of Trudeau's panel.

It also features Melinda Gates, Jonas Prising, Sheryl Sandberg, and Zhang Xin.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

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Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


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