Rob Lowe's sons constantly troll him on social media and it's seriously hilarious
Rob Lowe/Instagram

Rob Lowe has an adorable bond with his sons, which has turned into a hilarious, ongoing roast of him on social media.

Several years ago, I read his essay about his eldest son going off to college and was blown away. I had no idea that Lowe was a writer, but his heartfelt words about his kids growing up brought me to tears. Just check out an excerpt, and you'll see what I mean:


One of the great gifts of my life has been having my boys, Matthew and Johnowen, and through them, exploring the mysterious, complicated, and charged bond between fathers and sons. As my wife, Sheryl, and I raised them, I have discovered the depth of our relationship and the love and loss that flowed between my father and me. After my parents' divorce, when I was four, I spent weekends with my dad in Ohio. By the time Sunday rolled around, I was incapable of enjoying the day's activities because I was already dreading the inevitable goodbye of the evening.

Now, standing among Matthew's accumulation of possessions, I realize it's me who has become a boy again. All my heavy-chested sadness, loss, and longing to hold on to things as they used to be are back, sweeping over me as they did when I was a child.

In front of Sheryl and Matthew, I'm doing some of the best acting of my career. I smile like a jack-o'-lantern and affect a breezy, casual manner—positive sentences only and nothing but enthusiasm framing my answers to Matthew's questions.

As a mom of teens myself, Lowe's self-reflection and processing as he prepares to leave his son moved me. Lowe clearly has a close, loving relationship with his boys, Matthew and John.

RELATED: These men created a support group for fathers. They're changing what it means to be a dad.

That's what makes their constant trolling of him on social media all the more hilarious.

Facebook user Erica Zinman shared screenshots of some of Lowe's Instagram posts with comments his sons left on them, and there are some delightfully wicked burns in the bunch.

For example, this post-workout photo of Lowe, in which he talks about how you should be sweating if you work out hard enough. His son John totally ignored the exercise advice and wrote, "The subtle art of taking a selfie in front ur Emmy nominations."

LOLOLOLOL

Rob Lowe/Instagram

Or this one of topless Lowe, with Johnny poking fun of his pecks. "Maybe skip chest day for a while."

Rob Lowe/Instagram

Or how about this photo of the three men which Lowe captioned "Threesome"? John was not having it.

"I don't condone this caption."

You are rich and famous actor, Rob Lowe, posing with another rich and famous actor, Michael Douglass. You're both dressed to the nines at a red carpet event with other rich and famous people milling around behind you.

That won't protect you from your kids making fun of your clothes.

RELATED: The beautiful way fatherhood's evolved — in 7 awesome photos.

"Why does it look like you are wearing pads under your suit?" Matthew wrote.

That is *LITerally* the definition of humbling your old man.

Rob Lowe/Instagram

Oh but they're not done. Nothing like making your sex symbol father look like a bumbling old man by poking fun of his photo cropping skills.

"We gave up on smart cropping, right?" John wrote. "We must have."

Rob Lowe/Instagram

The boys also turn the tables sometimes on their dear old dad. When Lowe shared a man-contemplating-life photo from the Galapagos Islands, John chastised him for not texting him back.

"So u have time to instagram but not to text me back hmmmm," he wrote.

Ouch, the burn.

Speaking of burn, this swipe at Lowe's acting is hilarious. As Lowe appears to be hanging precariously from a clip outcropping with the cheezy caption, "Hanging out here in Cape Town," John writes, "This may be your best piece of acting."

OMG. It's too much.

Rob Lowe/Instagram

Even when he's doing his thing in the spotlight in front of crowds of fans, Lowe's sons know just how to keep his feet on the ground. Lowe shared a photo of him at his live show in Las Vegas, only to get an epic ego smackdown from his offspring.

"Stamos would have sold it out," wrote John.

Anybody got some aloe vera handy?

Rob Lowe/Instagram

Every photo in Lowe's Instagram feed includes his sons totally ripping on him, and it's totally hilarious.

For instance, this recent photo of the Lowe family men, including John and Matthew, earned the following comments from the boys:

"Still playing with IG effects like it's 2014." - John

"This hurts me as a photographer that you made it look like a bad Bob Ross painting." - Matthew

It doesn't matter how much fame or much money you have—kids are kids and parents are parents. And Rob Lowe's kids sure know how to have fun at their famous dad's expense, much to the delight of the rest of us.

(If you look through the family's Instagram feeds, you'll easily see that they really are a loving, supportive family. They just have a savage sense of humor to go along with it.)


Courtesy of Verizon
True

If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Welp, the two skateboarding events added to the Olympics this year have wrapped up for the women's teams, and the results are historic in more ways than one.

Japan's Kokona Hiraki, age 12, just won the silver medal in women's park skateboarding, making her Japan's youngest Olympic medalist ever. Great Britain's Sky Brown, who was 12 when she qualified for the Tokyo Olympics and is now 13, won the bronze, making her Great Britain's youngest medalist ever. And those two medal wins mean that two-thirds of the six medalists in the two women's skateboarding events are age 13 or younger. (The gold and silver medalists in women's street skateboarding, Japan's Momiji Nishiya and Brazil's Rayssa Leal, are also 13.)

That's mind-blowing.

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