Rob Lowe's sons constantly troll him on social media and it's seriously hilarious
Rob Lowe/Instagram

Rob Lowe has an adorable bond with his sons, which has turned into a hilarious, ongoing roast of him on social media.

Several years ago, I read his essay about his eldest son going off to college and was blown away. I had no idea that Lowe was a writer, but his heartfelt words about his kids growing up brought me to tears. Just check out an excerpt, and you'll see what I mean:


One of the great gifts of my life has been having my boys, Matthew and Johnowen, and through them, exploring the mysterious, complicated, and charged bond between fathers and sons. As my wife, Sheryl, and I raised them, I have discovered the depth of our relationship and the love and loss that flowed between my father and me. After my parents' divorce, when I was four, I spent weekends with my dad in Ohio. By the time Sunday rolled around, I was incapable of enjoying the day's activities because I was already dreading the inevitable goodbye of the evening.

Now, standing among Matthew's accumulation of possessions, I realize it's me who has become a boy again. All my heavy-chested sadness, loss, and longing to hold on to things as they used to be are back, sweeping over me as they did when I was a child.

In front of Sheryl and Matthew, I'm doing some of the best acting of my career. I smile like a jack-o'-lantern and affect a breezy, casual manner—positive sentences only and nothing but enthusiasm framing my answers to Matthew's questions.

As a mom of teens myself, Lowe's self-reflection and processing as he prepares to leave his son moved me. Lowe clearly has a close, loving relationship with his boys, Matthew and John.

RELATED: These men created a support group for fathers. They're changing what it means to be a dad.

That's what makes their constant trolling of him on social media all the more hilarious.

Facebook user Erica Zinman shared screenshots of some of Lowe's Instagram posts with comments his sons left on them, and there are some delightfully wicked burns in the bunch.

For example, this post-workout photo of Lowe, in which he talks about how you should be sweating if you work out hard enough. His son John totally ignored the exercise advice and wrote, "The subtle art of taking a selfie in front ur Emmy nominations."

LOLOLOLOL

Rob Lowe/Instagram

Or this one of topless Lowe, with Johnny poking fun of his pecks. "Maybe skip chest day for a while."

Rob Lowe/Instagram

Or how about this photo of the three men which Lowe captioned "Threesome"? John was not having it.

"I don't condone this caption."

You are rich and famous actor, Rob Lowe, posing with another rich and famous actor, Michael Douglass. You're both dressed to the nines at a red carpet event with other rich and famous people milling around behind you.

That won't protect you from your kids making fun of your clothes.

RELATED: The beautiful way fatherhood's evolved — in 7 awesome photos.

"Why does it look like you are wearing pads under your suit?" Matthew wrote.

That is *LITerally* the definition of humbling your old man.

Rob Lowe/Instagram

Oh but they're not done. Nothing like making your sex symbol father look like a bumbling old man by poking fun of his photo cropping skills.

"We gave up on smart cropping, right?" John wrote. "We must have."

Rob Lowe/Instagram

The boys also turn the tables sometimes on their dear old dad. When Lowe shared a man-contemplating-life photo from the Galapagos Islands, John chastised him for not texting him back.

"So u have time to instagram but not to text me back hmmmm," he wrote.

Ouch, the burn.

Speaking of burn, this swipe at Lowe's acting is hilarious. As Lowe appears to be hanging precariously from a clip outcropping with the cheezy caption, "Hanging out here in Cape Town," John writes, "This may be your best piece of acting."

OMG. It's too much.

Rob Lowe/Instagram

Even when he's doing his thing in the spotlight in front of crowds of fans, Lowe's sons know just how to keep his feet on the ground. Lowe shared a photo of him at his live show in Las Vegas, only to get an epic ego smackdown from his offspring.

"Stamos would have sold it out," wrote John.

Anybody got some aloe vera handy?

Rob Lowe/Instagram

Every photo in Lowe's Instagram feed includes his sons totally ripping on him, and it's totally hilarious.

For instance, this recent photo of the Lowe family men, including John and Matthew, earned the following comments from the boys:

"Still playing with IG effects like it's 2014." - John

"This hurts me as a photographer that you made it look like a bad Bob Ross painting." - Matthew

It doesn't matter how much fame or much money you have—kids are kids and parents are parents. And Rob Lowe's kids sure know how to have fun at their famous dad's expense, much to the delight of the rest of us.

(If you look through the family's Instagram feeds, you'll easily see that they really are a loving, supportive family. They just have a savage sense of humor to go along with it.)


Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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Researchers at Harvard University have studied the connection between spanking and kids' brain development for the first time, and their findings echo what studies have indicated for years: Spanking isn't good for children.

Comments on this article will no doubt be filled with people who a) say they were spanked and "turned out fine" or b) say that the reason kids are [fill in the blank with some societal ill] these days are because they aren't spanked. However, a growing body of research points to spanking creating more problems than it solves.

"We know that children whose families use corporal punishment are more likely to develop anxiety, depression, behavior problems, and other mental health problems, but many people don't think about spanking as a form of violence," said Katie A. McLaughlin, director of the Stress & Development Lab in the Department of Psychology, and the senior researcher on the study which was published Friday in the journal Child Development. "In this study, we wanted to examine whether there was an impact of spanking at a neurobiological level, in terms of how the brain is developing."

You can read the entire study here, but the gist is that kids' brain activity was measured using an MRI machine as they reacted to photos of actors displaying "fearful" and "neutral" faces. What researchers found was that kids who had been spanked had similar brain neural responses to fearful faces as kids who had been abused.

"There were no regions of the brain where activation to fearful relative to neutral faces differed between children who were abused and children who were spanked," the authors wrote in a statement.

Keep Reading Show less
Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less