Prince Harry is not happy about how the press has been treating his girlfriend.

Prince Harry wants the press to stop harassing his new girlfriend, Meghan Markle.

On Nov. 8, the royal's communications team issued a statement lambasting the abusive, sexist, and racial undertones used by press and social media when talking about Markle.

Prince Harry has "seen a line crossed," the statement reads:


"His girlfriend, Meghan Markle, has been subject to a wave of abuse and harassment. Some of this has been very public — the smear on the front page of a national newspaper; the racial undertones of comment pieces; and the outright sexism and racism of social media trolls and web article comments."

Markle at the Women in Cable Telecommunications Signature Luncheon in 2015. Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for WICT.

In the letter, the royal family specifically calls out and condemns the racist and sexist harassment Markle has been facing.

The statement describes incidents of photographers attempting to gain entry into Markle's home, bribes offered to Markle's ex-boyfriend, and "the bombardment of nearly every friend, co-worker, and loved one in her life."

Prince Harry has only been dating Markle for a few months. In fact, this is the first time the relationship has been publicly confirmed.

Despite that, British tabloids have already run several insidious stories about her. One of them suggested she appeared in pornography, when, in fact, clips of the TV show that Markle co-stars in had simply been uploaded to a porn site.

Markle, who is biracial, has also been the target of racially charged online comments and tweets.

Photo by Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images.

It's a pretty big deal for the royal family to come to Markle's defense.

They have a long history of fighting with the press over scrutiny of their private lives. It's also a personal subject for them since the death of Princess Diana in 1997 was the result of trying to outrun paparazzi. This is the first time, though, they've publicly defended someone outside of the family, specifically condemning racism and sexism.

It's unprecedented for the family to issue a statement like this, but the treatment of Markle was so bad that Prince Harry was apparently afraid for her safety and for that of her family.

The letter also addresses those who say that harassment is just the price you have to pay for celebrity.

"It is not right that a few months into a relationship with him that Ms. Markle should be subjected to such a storm," the statement says. "He knows commentators will say this is 'the price she has to pay' and that 'this is all part of the game'. He strongly disagrees. This is not a game — it is her life and his."

Prince Harry in 2016. Photo by Joe Giddins/WPA Pool/Getty Images.

The letter makes no demands; it simply calls on members of the press to "reflect" for a moment before any more damage is done.

Maybe that's something we should all do.

We certainly have a similar problem here in America. In fact, we practically invented celebrity culture, and there are countless examples of celebrities being harassed or assaulted online and in person.

When a man launched himself at Kim Kardashian, for example, many headlines made jokes at her expense and failed to treat the incident as what it was: sexual assault.

When someone is in the spotlight, it can be too easy to forget that they're a human being — that they have feelings and an identity. It can be too easy to forget that we don't own them and that they deserve to be treated with the same amount of respect and dignity as anyone else.

Courtesy of Verizon
True

If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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