People are slamming famous punk rocker for complaining about the homeless. But he's got a good reason.

Los Angeles is experiencing a homelessness epidemic with the number of unhoused people rising 75% over the past six years.

About 54,000 of the city's four million residents are currently experiencing homelessness and the root cause is the city's lack of affordable housing. According to LAist, since 2000, renter incomes have decreased by 3% while rents have gone up 32%.

The city recently created a quarter-cent increase in its sales tax to fund programs to help house these residents, but encampments are still popping up throughout the city.


Venice Beach, a swanky West L.A. neighborhood famous for its eccentric residents, has seen one of the largest increases in unhoused people.

Shell Smith / Flickr

Venice Beach resident Johnny Lydon (aka Johnny Rotten), lead vocalist of iconic punk groups Sex Pistols and Public Image Ltd, has become fed up with the unhoused people in his neighborhood and has even called the cops on them.

“They moved in en masse. They're all young, they're all like 24," Rotten told Newsweek. “They're aggressive, and because there's an awful lot of them together they're gang-y."

He recently called the police on some people for setting up an encampment in front of his house. “They came over the gate and put their tent inside, right in front of the front door. It's like... the audacity," he complained.

Rotten's outrage is ironic, given the fact he penned the authority-bashing classic “Anarchy in the U.K."

People on social media are bashing Lydon for what appears to be hypocritical coming from a man who once said, "If you give me the chance, I'll destroy America for you."

While it's easy to point a finger at Rotten for betraying his punk image, he's dealing with serious personal issues. His wife Nora Forster is in the mid-stages of Alzheimer's Disease. Lydon says his wife is “struggling to cope" with the influx of vagrants.

Lydon insists he's not a hypocrite.

“No, I'm a bloke that's worked hard for his money and I expect to be able to use my own front door," he said in his usual blunt matter.

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Sir David Attenborough has one of the most recognized and beloved voices in the world. The British broadcaster and nature historian has spent most of his 94 years on Earth educating humanity about the wonders of the natural world, inspiring multiple generations to care about the planet we all call home.

And now, Attenborough has made a new name for himself. Not only has he joined the cool kids on Instagram, he's broken the record for reaching a million followers in the shortest period. It only took four hours and 44 minutes, which is less time than it took Jennifer Aniston, who held the title before him at 5 hours and 16 minutes.

A day later, Attenborough is sitting at a whopping 3.4 million followers. And he only has two Instagram posts so far, both of them videos. But just watch his first one and you'll see why he's attracted so many fans.

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Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

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One night in 2018, Sheila and Steve Albers took their two youngest sons out to dinner. Their 17-year-old son, John, was in a crabby mood—not an uncommon occurrence for the teen who struggled with mental health issues—so he stayed home.

A half hour later, Sheila's started getting text messages that John wasn't safe. He had posted messages with suicidal ideations on social media and his friends had called the police to check on him. The Albers immediately raced home.

When they got there, they were met with a surreal scene. Their minivan was in the neighbor's yard across the street. John had been shot in the driver's seat six times by a police officer who had arrived to check on him. The officer had fired two shots as the teen slowly backed the van out of the garage, then 11 more after the van spun around backward. But all the officers told the Albers was that John had "passed" and had been shot. They wouldn't find out until the next day who had shot and killed him.

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