More

Obama crushed this interview on racism. Too bad everyone missed his point on it.

President Obama's hourlong interview on "WTF with Marc Maron" is refreshingly honest and smart. But it's his comments on racism, along with one pesky racial slur, that seem to have everyone worked up.

Obama crushed this interview on racism. Too bad everyone missed his point on it.


Image by Center for American Progress Action Fund.


President Obama shared some important thoughts on the current state of racism in the United States, but everyone's hung up on his use of the n-word.

Yes, Obama used the n-word in an interview about his thoughts on racism. But judging by the headlines following the interview, you'd think the slur was the only thing he uttered.

In reality, the n-word was the least notable portion of the president's interview with Maron. The rest of it was pretty badass. Here's the full quote:

"It is incontrovertible that race relations have improved significantly during my lifetime and yours and that opportunities have opened up and that attitudes have changed. That is a fact. What is also true is that the legacy of slavery, Jim Crow, discrimination in almost every institution of our lives, that casts a long shadow. And that's still part of our DNA that's passed on. We're not cured of it. ... Racism, we're not cured of it. And it's not just a matter of it not being polite to say n****r in public. That's not the measure of whether racism still exists or not. It's not just a matter of overt discrimination. Societies don't, overnight, completely erase everything that happened 200 to 300 years prior."

Did you catch that? Obama said that we focus more on the n-word than the stuff that matters. And then ... our news media focused more on him saying the N word than the stuff that matters!


GIF from "Dear White People."

Spoiler alert: Racism is a lot bigger than racial slurs.

Yes, the n-word is bad. I hope that's something we can all agree on. But in reality racism isn't just about hurtful words.

"What is also true is that the legacy of slavery, Jim Crow, discrimination in almost every institution of our lives, that casts a long shadow. And that's still part of our DNA that's passed on."
— President Obama

While there's no denying we've made a lot of progress when it comes to racial equality, our nation's history still plays a huge role in where we are today. So in order for progress to continue, we have to talk about all the other stuff. Like how children of color face harsher punishments in school, which often ushers them into the prison system or how people of color often face discrimination when looking for jobs and housing. Those are the lasting effects of Jim Crow and discrimination that Obama was talking about. Truthfully, I'm burnt out on the whole n-word conversation. Who "can" say it, who "can't" say it, and who's ever said it is actually less important than dismantling institutional and structural racism. So let's agree to skip the slurs and talk about the hard stuff instead.

via Pexels

A new Gallup poll found a significant increase in the number of Americans who identify as LGBT since the last time it conducted a similar poll in 2017.

The poll found that 5.6% of U.S. adults identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. That's a large increase from the 2017 poll that had the number at 4.5%.

"More than half of LGBT adults (54.6%) identify as bisexual. About a quarter (24.5%) say they are gay, with 11.7% identifying as lesbian and 11.3% as transgender. An additional 3.3% volunteer another non-heterosexual preference or term to describe their sexual orientation, such as queer or same-gender-loving," the poll says.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of Creative Commons
True

After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

Keep Reading Show less

As the nation helplessly watches our highest halls of government toss justice to the wind, a 2nd grader has given us someplace to channel our frustrations. In a hilarious video rant, a youngster named Taylor shared a story that has folks ready to go to the mat for her and her beloved, pink, perfect attendance pencil.

Keep Reading Show less
via wakaflockafloccar / TikTok

It's amazing to consider just how quickly the world has changed over the past 11 months. If you were to have told someone in February 2020 that the entire country would be on some form of lockdown, nearly everyone would be wearing a mask, and half a million people were going to die due to a virus, no one would have believed you.

Yet, here we are.

PPE masks were the last thing on Leah Holland of Georgetown, Kentucky's mind on March 4, 2020, when she got a tattoo inspired by the words of a close friend.

Keep Reading Show less