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Meet the female surgeons who are calling for a change in medical culture.

#ILookLikeASurgeon is making a big difference in the medical community.

Meet the female surgeons who are calling for a change in medical culture.

For the past two months, surgeons from across the globe have been tweeting under the hashtag #ILookLikeASurgeon.

They're calling out unequal treatment in the workplace, offering support for one another, and showing the world what a diverse operating room could look like.

The viral movement was founded by Dr. Heather Logghe.

The general surgery resident at the University of North Carolina Health Care tweeted the hashtag after watching Twitter users challenge engineering stereotypes through #ILookLikeAnEngineer.


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Logghe, the surgeon who created the hashtag, with her family. Her daughter celebrated her first birthday in the intern room at the hospital. Photo used with permission.

“It is hard to find role models that remind you of yourself as a woman in surgery," Logghe told Today. “It's been so traditionally male and unfortunately so many of the female role models have had to conform to the male stereotypes to survive."

Unfortunately, Logghe's thoughts about the lack of female power in the operating room aren't unusual.

Despite earning advanced degrees and entering the workforce at rates comparable to (and sometimes exceeding) men, women still face gender-based challenges in their careers. Female surgeons know that as well as anyone because women make up only one-third of surgery programs in the U.S.

After Logghe tweeted her thoughts at #ILookLikeASurgeon, she realized that other female surgeons experienced challenges in the operating room just like she did.

One of the most common experiences that these surgeons referenced? Colleagues and patients often assume that female surgeons are nurses.

One female surgeon suggested using this standard reply:

The hashtag has also provided female surgeons with the opportunity to "meet" female surgeon role models.

One Twitter user pointed out that this is especially important for a field where where most professional mentors are still male.

As the hashtag blew up, surgeons of other minority groups joined the call for a culture change, too.

Surgeons told stories of uncomfortable work environments for people of color and surgeons with disabilities. They also discussed the challenges of balancing work and life with family, something that resonated not only with surgeons, but with male and female doctors in other fields and med students as well.

“I've heard from many men who want the [medical] workplace culture to change so they can lead fuller lives and be fully present parents," Logghe told Upworthy.

The coolest part of #ILookLikeASurgeon? It's actually changing things in the medical community.

Medical journals and organizations have now expressed their support of diversity in the operating room, and #ILookLikeASurgeon is expected to be a major theme in the upcoming Association of Women Surgeons conference, too.

Plus, this online movement shows us that surgeons (and engineers, and game developers, and professors) can look like just about anyone.

Cheers to you, Dr. Heather Logghe!

Courtesy of Verizon
True

If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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