This guy applied for 60 jobs and got 1 interview from places that said they were hiring

Man applies to 60 jobs and gets one interview.

Nobody wants to work anymore? Tell that to Joey Holz, the Florida man who applied to 60 entry-level jobs, only to receive one interview. Perhaps all of the problems facing the American labor market are, in fact, not due to widespread "laziness." Go figure.

Odds are you've seen a sign outside a place of business, lamenting a loss of employees. If not in real life, perhaps you've caught a quick glimpse on the internet. It's pretty widespread at this point. There's even a Facebook group titled "No one wants to work," where short-staffed employers could meme out their frustrations.


In an interview with Insider, former food-service worker and charter-boat crewman Joey Holz recalled hearing one business owner's labor shortage complaint, saying he "went on this rant about how he can't find help and he can't keep anybody in his medical facility because they all quit over the stimulus checks."

Holz continued, "And I'm like, 'Your medical professionals quit over $1,200 checks? That's weird.'"



Weird indeed, considering that even after the end of federal unemployment benefits, there hasn't been a surge in employment. Holz told Insider "If this extra money that everyone's supposedly living off of stopped in June and it's now September, obviously, that's not what's stopping them," he said.

Holz decided to inquire/investigate further. He started applying for jobs himself, starting with restaurants, which had been more outspoken about their staffing obstacles. The rule was to only apply for roles he actually qualified for. He told Insider "I didn't apply for anything that required a degree. I didn't apply for anything that said 'must have six months experience in this thing.'"

Describing the common job qualifications, Joey noted that "some jobs wanted a high-school diploma … some wanted retail experience … most of them either said 'willing to train' or 'minimum experience.'" In terms of the pay, "none of them were over $12 an hour."

In an amazing show of his administrative skills, Holz even tracked his process in a spreadsheet. The results? Pretty abysmal. Out of 28 job applications, he received only nine email responses. But hey, that led to one interview! Oh boy, here comes the big turnaround.

Holz went to interview for a full-time site cleanup position with a construction company. Where the hourly rate was advertised as $10, the company instead tried to negotiate that down to $8.65. And instead of full time, they offered part time until Holz gained seniority.

By the end of his experiment, Holz had sent out 60 applications and subsequently received 16 email responses, four follow-up phone calls, and the one interview with a company that misadvertised its hourly rate. He shared a pie chart showing that 70% of his efforts received no reply.


So, is this really a case of entitled generations waiting for government handouts? The chart suggests otherwise. Holz has a clear stance on the subject. In a Facebook post that went viral on Twitter and Reddit, he wrote, "58 applications says y'all aren't desperate for workers, you just miss your slaves."

Seems like Joey has hit the nail on the head. People aren't laying back, they're fed up. Fed up with toxic work environments and unlivable wages, to the point of "rage quitting" and starting anti-work subreddits lambasting the terrible bedside manner of most bosses.

Like this bartender, who wasn't a "team player" for drinking on his night off.

Nobody wants to work anymore r/antiwork thread on TwitterTwitter

Or this worker who–despite being the top performer–received a complaint from his boss about not standing on a broken foot.

After6 0 job applications this man only received one interview r/antiwork thread on TwitterTwitter

No amount of sloth-blasting rhetoric is going to change the fact that a systematic change, one that actually causes the workplace to thrive and promote well-being, needs to be made. And as Holz told Insider, his story is "familiar to many." Maybe this isn't an act of apathy and more like a cry for help.

Joy

Meet Eva, the hero dog who risked her life saving her owner from a mountain lion

Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva when a mountain lion suddenly appeared.

Photo by Didssph on Unsplash

A sweet face and fierce loyalty: Belgian Malinois defends owner.

The Belgian Malinois is a special breed of dog. It's highly intelligent, extremely athletic and needs a ton of interaction. While these attributes make the Belgian Malinois the perfect dog for police and military work, they can be a bit of a handful as a typical pet.

As Belgian Malinois owner Erin Wilson jokingly told NPR, they’re basically "a German shepherd on steroids or crack or cocaine.”

It was her Malinois Eva’s natural drive, however, that ended up saving Wilson’s life.

According to a news release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva slightly ahead of her when a mountain lion suddenly appeared and swiped Wilson across the left shoulder. She quickly yelled Eva’s name and the dog’s instincts kicked in immediately. Eva rushed in to defend her owner.

It wasn’t long, though, before the mountain lion won the upper hand, much to Wilson’s horror.

She told TODAY, “They fought for a couple seconds, and then I heard her start crying. That’s when the cat latched on to her skull.”

Keep Reading Show less
Joy

50-years ago they trade a grilled cheese for a painting. Now it's worth a small fortune.

Irene and Tony Demas regularly traded food at their restaurant in exchange for crafts. It paid off big time.

Photo by Gio Bartlett on Unsplash

Painting traded for grilled cheese worth thousands.

The grilled cheese at Irene and Tony Demas’ restaurant was truly something special. The combination of freshly baked artisan bread and 5-year-old cheddar was enough to make anyone’s mouth water, but no one was nearly as devoted to the item as the restaurant’s regular, John Kinnear.

Kinnear loved the London, Ontario restaurant's grilled cheese so much that he ordered it every single day, though he wouldn’t always pay for it in cash. The Demases were well known for bartering their food in exchange for odds and ends from local craftspeople and merchants.

“Everyone supported everyone back then,” Irene told the Guardian, saying that the couple would often trade free soup and a sandwich for fresh flowers. Two different kinds of nourishment, you might say.

And so, in the 1970s the Demases made a deal with Kinnear that he could pay them for his grilled cheese sandwiches with artwork. Being a painter himself and part of an art community, Kinnear would never run out of that currency.

Little did Kinnear—or anyone—know, eventually he would give the Demases a painting worth an entire lifetime's supply of grilled cheeses. And then some.

Keep Reading Show less

Sandy Hook school shooting survivors are growing up and telling us what they've experienced.

This story originally appeared on 12.15.21


Imagine being 6 years old, sitting in your classroom in an idyllic small town, when you start hearing gunshots. Your teacher tries to sound calm, but you hear the fear in her voice as she tells you to go hide in your cubby. She says, "be quiet as a mouse," but the sobs of your classmates ring in your ears. In four minutes, you hear more than 150 gunshots.

You're in the first grade. You wholeheartedly believe in Santa Claus and magic. You're excited about losing your front teeth. Your parents still prescreen PG-rated films so they can prepare you for things that might be scary in them.

And yet here you are, living through a horror few can fathom.

Keep Reading Show less