Kate Middleton said exactly what she'd do if one of her kids had a mental illness.

Kate Middleton's children are young, but the Duchess of Cambridge already knows what she would do if either of them began showing symptoms of a mental illness later in life.

Photo by Mary Turner/WPA Pool/Getty Images.

"No parent would fail to call the doctor if their child developed a fever, yet some children are tackling tough times without the support that can help them because the adults in their life are scared to ask," the duchess said at the launch of a new podcast from the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families.


The Duchess of Cambridge leads a discussion at a school in Edinburgh, Scotland, about the mental health challenges that families face. Photo by Andrew Milligan/Getty Images.

"Both William and I feel very strongly that we wouldn’t hesitate to get expert support for George and Charlotte if they need it," she said.

Seeking treatment for a mental illness is a process that can be fraught with confusion, roadblocks, and, perhaps most damaging: stigma.

Many living with mental disorders find the risk of shame, stereotyping, and exclusion from employment and social circles too great to consider getting treated. A study commissioned by the World Health Organization estimated that for some illnesses, over 50% of those with diagnosable symptoms are not under the care of a medical professional.

Even when sufferers manage to overcome those obstacles, in the United States, treatment can be expensive and good care hard to find.

For families with adolescent children — when many mental disorders are most likely to manifest — the choice can be a difficult one.

Patients with mental disorders deserve judgment-free access to care like they would get for any other disease.

High-profile statements like the duchess', which draw a straight line between mental and physical illness, go a long way to helping build empathy for sufferers.

Of course, the duke and duchess are uniquely positioned to access and afford care, and they live in a country where many mental health services are provided free of charge (though questions about the efficacy and availability of care persist).

But it's a positive sign that the duchess is using her platform to try to take the shame out of seeking help.

Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images.

It won't fix anything overnight.

But for families on the fence, the choice to seek help for themselves or their children may have just gotten a little easier.

This article originally appeared on 01.09.18


Why should a superintendent get a raise while teachers in the same district struggling to make ends meet see their paychecks flatline — year after year after year?

Teacher Deyshia Hargrave begged the question. Minutes later, she was handcuffed and placed in the backseat of a cop car.

The scene was captured below by YouTube user Chris Rosa, who attended a board meeting for Vermilion Parish Schools in Louisiana.

You can watch Hargrave begin speaking about 33 seconds in. The situation starts becoming contentious around 6:35 minutes. Hargrave is arrested at 8:35, and then walked outside in handcuffs and placed in the back of police vehicle. (Story continues below.)



"We work very hard with very little to maintain the salaries that we have," Hargrave, who teaches middle school language arts, said during a public comment portion of the meeting, stating that she's seen classroom sizes balloon during her time at the school with no increased compensation. "We're meeting those goals, while someone in that position of leadership [the superintendent] is getting raise? It's a sad, sad day to be a teacher in Vermilion Parish."

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