Kate Middleton said exactly what she'd do if one of her kids had a mental illness.

Kate Middleton's children are young, but the Duchess of Cambridge already knows what she would do if either of them began showing symptoms of a mental illness later in life.

Photo by Mary Turner/WPA Pool/Getty Images.

"No parent would fail to call the doctor if their child developed a fever, yet some children are tackling tough times without the support that can help them because the adults in their life are scared to ask," the duchess said at the launch of a new podcast from the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families.


The Duchess of Cambridge leads a discussion at a school in Edinburgh, Scotland, about the mental health challenges that families face. Photo by Andrew Milligan/Getty Images.

"Both William and I feel very strongly that we wouldn’t hesitate to get expert support for George and Charlotte if they need it," she said.

Seeking treatment for a mental illness is a process that can be fraught with confusion, roadblocks, and, perhaps most damaging: stigma.

Many living with mental disorders find the risk of shame, stereotyping, and exclusion from employment and social circles too great to consider getting treated. A study commissioned by the World Health Organization estimated that for some illnesses, over 50% of those with diagnosable symptoms are not under the care of a medical professional.

Even when sufferers manage to overcome those obstacles, in the United States, treatment can be expensive and good care hard to find.

For families with adolescent children — when many mental disorders are most likely to manifest — the choice can be a difficult one.

Patients with mental disorders deserve judgment-free access to care like they would get for any other disease.

High-profile statements like the duchess', which draw a straight line between mental and physical illness, go a long way to helping build empathy for sufferers.

Of course, the duke and duchess are uniquely positioned to access and afford care, and they live in a country where many mental health services are provided free of charge (though questions about the efficacy and availability of care persist).

But it's a positive sign that the duchess is using her platform to try to take the shame out of seeking help.

Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images.

It won't fix anything overnight.

But for families on the fence, the choice to seek help for themselves or their children may have just gotten a little easier.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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4 minutes of silence can boost your empathy for others. Watch as refugees try it out.

We could all benefit from breaking down some of the walls in our lives.

Images via Amnesty Poland

This article originally appeared on 05.26.16


You'd be hard-pressed to find a place on Earth with more wall-based symbolism than Berlin, Germany.

But there, in the heart of Germany's capital city, strangers sat across from one another, staring into each other's eyes. To the uninitiated, it may look as though you've witnessed some sort of icy standoff. The truth, however, couldn't be more different.

This was about tearing down walls between people.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."