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Jen Welter was just hired as the NFL's first-ever female coaching intern.

She was used to knocking down other players. Now she's knocking down barriers.

Jen Welter is a professional badass. Her resume is absolutely incredible.

She is a professional American football player and a doctor of psychology, and she was the first woman to coach a men's professional football team, running the linebackers and special teams units for the Texas Revolution arena football team in 2015.


That's Jen flying off the edge for the sack. GIF from Jen Welter.

But if you only remember one thing about Jen Welter, know this: She once played running back in a game alongside the Texas Revolution (before her coaching days), making her the first woman to ever play a non-kicking position in a men's professional football game.

After getting pummeled by a 6'4", 254-pound defensive lineman (she was 36 at the time and weighed about 130 pounds), Welter got up and asked him, "Is that all you got?"

And that's just the beginning of her amazing story.

Jen was just hired as a coaching intern for the Arizona Cardinals. She's the first woman to ever hold any type of coaching position in the NFL.

Welter was an assistant coach for the Texas Revolution this year. Photo courtesy of Jerry Acuff Photography.

The Cardinals announced on Monday that Jen would be joining the team through training camp and the preseason as a coaching intern working with the team's inside linebackers. The team has also scheduled a press conference to introduce Jen on Tuesday.


The Cardinals head coach, Bruce Arians, said in March: "Someone asked me yesterday, 'When are we going to have female coaches?' The minute they can prove they can make a player better, they'll be hired."

I think we can all agree there's a little more to it than that, otherwise this would have happened a long time ago. And there's no guarantee that Welter will have a job once her internship ends before the start of the regular season.

But if her track record tells us anything, it's that she won't be intimidated by the hulking men in that locker room.

If they're smart, they'll realize they can learn a lot from her.

2015 is shaping up to be a really exciting season for fans of the NFL.

Jen's not afraid to lower the boom on a man twice her size. Photo courtesy of Fred Shots Photography.

Every season swirls with intrigue – young players on the cusp of stardom and veteran superstars battling their fading skills, Cinderella teams and perennial juggernauts. The 2015 NFL season will have all that, and more — including the league's first female referee, and now its first female coach.

The NFL has taken a lot of criticism over the last few years, much of it well-deserved, but it's awesome to see the game so many of us love adapting and making changes to better itself.

Hold on, Frankie! Mama's coming!

How do you explain motherhood in a nutshell? Thanks to Cait Oakley, who stopped a preying bald eagle from capturing her pet goose as she breastfed her daughter, we have it summed up in one gloriously hilarious TikTok.

The now viral video shows the family’s pet goose, Frankie, frantically squawking as it gets dragged off the porch by a bald eagle—likely another mom taking care of her own kiddos.

Wearing nothing but her husband’s boxers while holding on to her newborn, Willow, Oakley dashes out of the house and successfully comes to Frankie's rescue while yelling “hey, hey hey!”

The video’s caption revealed that the Oakleys had already lost three chickens due to hungry birds of prey, so nothing was going to stop “Mama bear” from protecting “sweet Frankie.” Not even a breastfeeding session.

Oakley told TODAY Parents, “It was just a split second reaction ...There was nowhere to put Willow down at that point.” Sometimes being a mom means feeding your child and saving your pet all at the same time.

As for how she feels about running around topless in her underwear on camera, Oakley declared, “I could have been naked and I’m like, ‘whatever, I’m feeding my baby.’”

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10/10. The Mayyas dance.

We can almost always expect to see amazing acts and rare skills on “America’s Got Talent.” But sometimes, we get even more than that.

The Mayyas, a Lebanese women’s dance troupe whose name means “proud walk of a lioness,” delivered a performance so mesmerizing that judge Simon Cowell called it the “best dance act” the show has ever seen, winning them an almost instant golden buzzer.

Perhaps this victory comes as no surprise, considering that the Mayyas had previously won “Arab’s Got Talent” in 2019 and competed on “Britain’s Got Talent: The Champions.” But truly, it’s what motivates them to take to the stage that’s remarkable.

“Lebanon is a very beautiful country, but we live a daily struggle," one of the dancers said to the judges just moments before their audition. Another explained, “being a dancer as a female Arab is not fully supported yet.”

Nadim Cherfan, the team’s choreographer, added that “Lebanon is not considered a place where you can build a career out of dancing, so it’s really hard, and harder for women.”

Still, Cherfan shared that it was a previous “AGT” star who inspired the Mayyas to defy the odds and audition anyway. Nightbirde, a breakout singer who also earned a golden buzzer before tragically passing away in February 2021 due to cancer, had told the audience, “You can't wait until life isn't hard anymore before you decide to be happy.” The dance team took the advice to heart.

For the Mayyas, coming onto the “AGT” stage became more than an audition opportunity. Getting emotional, one of the dancers declared that it was “our only chance to prove to the world what Arab women can do, the art we can create, the fights we fight.”

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