James Blake made a great point about sexism after claims his famous girlfriend 'inspired' new album

You know the old saying, "Behind every successful man is a good woman?" Well, sometimes that good woman is right there alongside the man, putting in just as much effort as the man. Her work and effort shouldn't be relegated to a footnote. Musician James Blake, who has been dating the Good Place actress and activist Jameela Jamil since 2015, just laid out why partners deserve credit for their work.

Billboard Tweeted a clip of an interview with Blake. "Backstage at ACL Music Festival, @jamesblake discusses his latest album 'Assume Form,' how his girlfriend Jameela Jamil inspired the record, and teases new music. #ACLFest," Billboard Tweeted. The only problem is, Jamil didn't "inspire" the album. She actually worked on it, something Blake mentioned in the interview. "She has an incredible musical instinct. She's like a mini Rick Rubin in her own way," Blake told Billboard. "And … I'm not just saying this because she's my girlfriend. … She has a credit on the album itself. And it's not just a kind of shoutout. It's genuine, you know, work."




Blake corrected the publication, making sure Jamil's work got properly acknowledged. "Not just inspired it - she actually worked on it. I even said it in the interview, but people focus on 'inspired' because the idea of the 'muse' is so romantic and pervasive," he Tweeted back.

But he didn't stop there. Blake pointed out that many partners go uncredited, even though thy put in as much (or more) work than the people getting all the glory. "In addition, women who help their partners with their album, being a sounding board and often their only emotional support during the process, almost invariably go uncredited, while majority male producers come in and make a tiny change to a track and they're Mr. golden balls," Blake said.

"Shout out to all the partners who selflessly placated a musician during a very self absorbed process like creating an album, who got the title 'muse' afterwards which basically amounts to being an object of affection while the musician exercises their 'genius'," he finished. Blake just summed up hashtag relationship goals in three Tweets.






Jamil is actually also credited as a producer on the album, which Blake also confirmed on Twitter. It kind of makes it even more b.s. that she'd be referred to as "inspiration."



Blake even gave Jamil credit way back in January when the album was released, because he's all supportive like that.



Jamil was touched that Blake said something. "I love this man a lot. He's a proper feminist," she wrote on Twitter.




Jamil wasn't the only person who was impressed. Some musicians were even inspired to give their partners credit as well.







Chocolate and flowers are nice, but getting properly acknowledged for your efforts is the ultimate grand romantic gesture.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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via Jules Lipoff / Twitter

Weronika Jachimowicz, 17, is getting a lot of attention for subverting people's expectations of who excels in high school. And that's exactly what she wants.

Jachimowicz was named New York's Mattituck-Cutchogue Union Free School District's 2021 salutatorian. Her yearbook photo next to valedictorian Luke Altman is going viral because of her dramatic Goth makeup and attire.

It all started when assistant professor and writer Dr. Jules Lipoff tweeted out a photo of the valedictorian and salutatorian he saw in a newspaper and it went viral. How many salutatorians have you seen that wear pentagram hoop earrings, a choker, and black devil horns?

The juxtaposition of her next to the bowtie-wearing Altman, makes the photo even more amusing.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less