More

If I needed an abortion, I would want to know these 5 obstacles to planning for the care I need.

This state says you have to wait, that state made it so hard for clinics to remain open that you have to drive several hours just to find one. Making the decision to abort is difficult enough, and on top of that, the extremists who are against it can make it a logistical nightmare. Here's what you need to know about getting an abortion in America.

If I needed an abortion, I would want to know these 5 obstacles to planning for the care I need.
True
Ultraviolet

If you're under 18 and decide abortion is your best option, you could be in for a difficult time depending on which state you live in and whether you have supportive parental units. Some states need no parental sign-off, and others require notarized permission from BOTH parents. Hopefully you have at least one parent you can lean on for support during this time, but that's not always every teenager's reality. Here's where you can find out what the law is in your state.


If it's been less than 13 weeks since your last period, you're not going to have a hard time because of this, but if it's been longer, find out what your state's laws are so you can plan to get the care you need in the time frame necessary. Check out the gestational limits by state in the third map in this link.

Abortions cost money, and there's been a whole lot of legislative shenanigans to prevent insurance and Medicaid from covering them (it differs by state). It can range anywhere from $300 to $950, with the average being around $450. If you need abortion care and pulling together the funds is impossible, try this link.

In some states, there are fewer than three abortion providers available. Some states have passed laws that make it so difficult to meet the standards needed to operate that facilities have no choice but to shut down. Call (800) 230-PLAN to get reliable information on providers in your area, and start thinking now about how you can get the time away and transportation you'll need.

Some states have passed mandatory waiting periods (see the first map here), meaning MORE time off from work or school AND more planning/expense for transportation and child care. If that weren't bad enough, some states require you to undergo an ultrasound (see the last map here). Sometimes they even stipulate that you look at the ultrasound screen with your eyeballs for some prescribed amount of time. It's sadistic, I know. Please line up a friend or family member to support you during the procedure, and accept my woman-in-solidarity virtual hug in advance.

To go over the above obstacles with a little more depth, watch the super-useful video below. And if you think women who aren't ready to be mothers could use a little more support and a lot less degradation, please share this and show that you support a woman's right to own her own destiny.

<span class="redactor-invisible-space"></span>
Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
True

Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

Amazon

In order to distinguish more sustainable products, the program partnered with a wide range of external certifications, including governmental agencies, non-profits, and independent laboratories, all of which have a focus on preserving the natural world.

Keep Reading Show less
True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.