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Here's 2 minutes of absolute truth about political revolution from Russell Brand.

Ever since I started paying attention, I've always liked what he has to say.

Time magazine asked Russell Brand what he meant by "revolution" and, as usual, he had some interesting things to say.

I've long been a fan of Russell Brand. Ever since he did things like this video on the owners of Walmart and the one about how people talk about white cops who kill black men, I've paid attention to what he has to say.

The clip below just kind of grabbed me. It was originally released before last November's elections, but it's so much more relevant today, leading up to the next big democratic event in our country — the elections of 2016.


He talks about true democracy as it relates to political funding.

When he talks about a political party or candidate who says, "We're not interested at all in money, we're not going to accept any donations," my ears perk up.

There is only one candidate who can say that. I'll let you figure out who it is. (Hint: There will be a lot of people in the comments mentioning a name … rhymes with Vernie Flanders.)

The fact is, American elections are often determined by who has the most money. (For example, in 2010, federal elections were won by the candidate with the most money almost 90% of the time.) Think about that for a second. A true revolution would flip that on its head!

What it really boils down to is taking back the power through our votes and our money.

But regardless of your political affiliations — R or D or I — or views on who is running for office, listen to the core of what Brand has to say here. One of my favorite quotes:

"The less concentrated power is, the better. The more people have access to their own communities, their own resources, running their own places of work, running their own residences — the better it is. These machines are here to serve us. If the machines don't serve us, switch the machines off. By 'us,' I mean the vast majority of people."

And one more to wet your whistle:

A revolution you say, Russell? Count me in.

(When he talks about "Hong Kong and democracy," He's talking about what happened last autumn, when, at its peak, up to 100,000 people were protesting for democracy.)

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