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Her son died at age 14. 23 years after donating his heart, she got to hear it beat again.

She lost her son long ago, but she got to hear a part of him that still lives.

What would you do if a complete stranger gave you a second chance at life?

It seems like an appropriate time to ugly cry. GIF from "America's Next Top Model."

It probably wouldn't feel like enough, but at the very least, you'd likely want to thank them.


Meet Daniel Titley. His life was saved when he received a heart transplant at just 11 years old thanks to a teenage donor.

Image from "Real Stories with Ranvir Singh."

As reported by "Real Stories with Ranvir Singh," Daniel was born with severe heart complications and the doctors said he wouldn't live past a few months. He underwent multiple surgeries, most of which helped, but he still needed a new heart. And he finally got one at the age of 11 thanks to a donation from a 14-year-old boy who had died in a car crash.

Daniel long wondered about the child who made his new lease on life possible.

At the age of 35, after having his new heart for twice as long as his original heart (!!!), he decided to find out exactly who this child was.

After some digging into records, he found out his donor was a teenager named Stephen Norris. Daniel was hesitant to reach out because he didn't want to remind the donor's family about a painful memory. But he contacted the family and asked to meet anyway. He had to say thank you.

His donor's mother, Gillian Norris, agreed to meet.

And when they embraced, she not only heard Daniel's thanks and appreciation. She got to listen to the heart of her son beating, 23 years after his death.

What? No, I'm not crying. I just have something in both of my eyes. GIF from "Real Stories with Ranvir Singh."

These types of meetings are rare. But Gillian and Daniel wanted to share this intimate moment with the world.

They wanted to encourage individuals and their families to participate in organ donation.

In case you missed the news, there's a shortage of organ donors in the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, a new name is added to the national transplant waiting list every 10 minutes and an average of 22 people die every day while waiting for an organ transplant. Daniel lives in the U.K., where up to three people a day die while waiting for a donation. That's still a lot of deaths that could have been prevented.

Gillian and Daniel's story shows how the benefit of organ donation goes beyond the lives saved. It's helpful for the survivors as well.

Making the decision about organ donation can be a really tough thing to do on top of dealing with losing a loved one. However, agreeing to it can be helpful for the survivor dealing with loss. Gillian is one of those people. She told ITV, "Knowing that there's people out there given time that they wouldn't have had without a donor is a comfort to me."

If you want to learn more about organ donation, including how join your state's donor registry, visit Donate Life America.

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Three people engaged in conversation at a party.

There are some people who live under the illusion that everything they say is deeply interesting and have no problem wasting your time by rambling on and on without a sign of stopping. They’re the relative, neighbor or co-worker who can’t take a hint that the conversation is over.

Of all these people, the co-worker who can’t stop talking may be the most challenging because you see them every day in a professional setting that requires politeness.

There are many reasons that some people talk excessively. Therapist F. Diane Barth writes in Psychology Today that some people talk excessively because they don’t have the ability to process complex auditory signals, so they ramble on without recognizing the subtle cues others are sending.

It may also be a case of someone who thinks they’re the most interesting person in the conversation.

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10/10. The Mayyas dance.

We can almost always expect to see amazing acts and rare skills on “America’s Got Talent.” But sometimes, we get even more than that.

The Mayyas, a Lebanese women’s dance troupe whose name means “proud walk of a lioness,” delivered a performance so mesmerizing that judge Simon Cowell called it the “best dance act” the show has ever seen, winning them an almost instant golden buzzer.

Perhaps this victory comes as no surprise, considering that the Mayyas had previously won “Arab’s Got Talent” in 2019, and competed on “Britain’s Got Talent: The Champions.” But truly, it’s what motivates them to take to the stage that’s remarkable.

“Lebanon is a very beautiful country, but we live a daily struggle," one of the dancers said to the judges just moments before their audition. Another explained, “being a dancer as a female Arab is not fully supported yet.”

Nadim Cherfan, the team’s choreographer, added that “Lebanon is not considered a place where you can build a career out of dancing, so it’s really hard, and harder for women.”

Still, Cherfan shared that it was a previous “AGT” star who inspired the Mayyas to defy the odds and audition anyway. Nightbirde, a breakout singer who also earned a golden buzzer before tragically passing away in February 2021 due to cancer, had told the audience, “You can't wait until life isn't hard anymore before you decide to be happy.” The dance team took the advice to heart.

For the Mayyas, coming onto the “AGT” stage became more than an audition opportunity. Getting emotional, one of the dancers declared that it was “our only chance to prove to the world what Arab women can do, the art we can create, the fights we fight.”

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One of these things is not like the other.

Sometimes, life can unexpectedly snatch you away from safety and thrust you into imminent danger. Other times, life can just as quickly turn a dire circumstance into a heartwarming miracle.

Such was the case for a baby hawk who went from being dinner to being adopted by a family of bald eagles near the city of Nanaimo in British Columbia, Canada. The amazing moment was captured by a 24-hour livestream webcam run by GROWLS, a nonprofit organization that helps rescue and rehabilitate injured wildlife.

The video shows the seemingly doomed baby hawk being tossed into an eaglet’s nest. Pam McCartney, a GROWLS volunteer who had been watching the livestream at the time, braced herself.

"Usually when I watch, like, David Attenborough and his shows, I can close my eyes or fast forward or whatever, but this was live at the time, and I was just like, oh, my gosh, oh, my gosh," she told CBC.

Much to her surprise, nature seemed to have something else in mind.

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