Two film producers made a rollerblading dancer's dream come true, and it's so dang wholesome

Parking lot dancer Reid Cornish is not your average performer.

Each weekday, Cornish dons his rollerblades and headphones, heads to his parking lot of choice, and puts on a show for everyone within eyeshot. As a person with Down syndrome, Cornish may be underestimated or overlooked by many, but his awesome performances have endeared him to countless Salt Lake City citizens.


His mother told Deseret News that his mission in life is to make people happy, and he does so with his joyful dance moves and contagious grin. Sometimes he spends hours dancing on his rollerblades, which he says keeps him limber. "Skating makes me happy all the time," he told the paper.

Cornish's sister Lisa recently shared a story about him on Facebook that has been shared 30,000 times and is just about the most wholesome thing ever:

"Some professional film producers befriended my brother Reid this year and have been a big boost to him, especially after our mother's passing in June. They learned that his dream is to perform in front of others, so for Christmas they made this video montage of his rollerblading shows in Salt Lake. What a generous gift! I can only imagine the time and love that went into this. (Thank you!) I hope you all enjoy this lively, 5-minute glimpse into my little brother's dreams."

If you need a pick me up today, this video will do it.

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Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

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