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Disney Introduces A Gay Couple On A Kids' Show, Confusing Children Everywhere. Wait, No...

Several months ago, Disney announced it was planning to feature a same-sex couple on its children's program "Good Luck Charlie." The episode that included a lesbian couple and their child finally aired. This may seem small, but Disney is big, and I like to believe that this is just the beginning. Yay progress!

Disney Introduces A Gay Couple On A Kids' Show, Confusing Children Everywhere. Wait, No...

A few years ago, my then-3-year-old had a preschool friend who had two moms. My daughter is extremely inquisitive, and rarely does an attempt to understand something new end after just one question.

So anyway, on the way home from a playdate, she asked me why her friend had two moms. I told her that sometimes, two women love each other and create a family, and sometimes, two men love each other and create a family. Just like her dad and I loved each other and created a family (through adoption in our case). She was all, "Oh, OK!" And that was the end of it because it's a really simple concept.


Props to Disney for finally introducing another type of family to our kids. They should grow up seeing how ordinary this is so that it's not even a "concept" they have to figure out. Let's encourage Disney and other networks to keep moving in this direction. You can hit the Facebook and Twitter buttons below to share!

Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
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The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected diverse communities due largely in part to social factors such as inadequate access to housing, income, dietary options, education and employment — all of which have been shown to affect people's physical health.

Recognizing that inequity, Harlem-based chef JJ Johnson sought out to help his community maximize its health during the pandemic — one grain at a time.

Johnson manages FIELDTRIP, a health-focused restaurant that strives to bring people together through the celebration of rice, a grain found in cuisines of countless cultures.

"It was very important for me to show the world that places like Harlem want access to more health-conscious foods," Johnson said. "The people who live in Harlem should have the option to eat fresh, locally farmed and delicious food that other communities have access to."

Lack of education and access to those healthy food options is a primary driver of why 31% of adults in Harlem are struggling with obesity — the highest rate of any neighborhood in New York City and 7% higher than the average adult obesity rate across the five boroughs.

Obesity increases risk for heart disease or diabetes, which in turn leaves Harlem's residents — who are 76% Black or LatinX — at heightened risk for complications with COVID-19.

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via KrustyKhajiit / YouTube

Thomas F. Wilson played one of the most recognizable villains in film history, Biff Tannen, in the "Back to the Future" series. So, understandably, he gets recognized wherever he goes for the iconic role.

The attention must be nice, but it has to get exhausting answering the same questions day in and day out about the films. So Wilson created a card that he carries with him to hand out to people that answers all the questions he gets asked on a daily basis.

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Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
True

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected diverse communities due largely in part to social factors such as inadequate access to housing, income, dietary options, education and employment — all of which have been shown to affect people's physical health.

Recognizing that inequity, Harlem-based chef JJ Johnson sought out to help his community maximize its health during the pandemic — one grain at a time.

Johnson manages FIELDTRIP, a health-focused restaurant that strives to bring people together through the celebration of rice, a grain found in cuisines of countless cultures.

"It was very important for me to show the world that places like Harlem want access to more health-conscious foods," Johnson said. "The people who live in Harlem should have the option to eat fresh, locally farmed and delicious food that other communities have access to."

Lack of education and access to those healthy food options is a primary driver of why 31% of adults in Harlem are struggling with obesity — the highest rate of any neighborhood in New York City and 7% higher than the average adult obesity rate across the five boroughs.

Obesity increases risk for heart disease or diabetes, which in turn leaves Harlem's residents — who are 76% Black or LatinX — at heightened risk for complications with COVID-19.

Keep Reading Show less
via Fox

On October 18, "The Simpsons" will debut it's 31st "Treehouse of Terror" Halloween episode. This year's show includes parodies of Pixar, "Toy Story," "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse" and Netflix's "Russian Doll."

A minute-long preview teasing the Halloween tradition also touches on a night that will be one of the scariest of our lifetimes. Millions of Americans are fearing what could go wrong on election day after living through the horror of 2016.

In the trailer, Homer is stuck in the voting booth, unsure of who to vote for for president. His progressive daughter, Lisa, steps into the booth to remind Homer of everything that has happened in the past four years.

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via WatchMojo / YouTube

There are two conflicting viewpoints when it comes to addressing culture from that past that contains offensive elements that would never be acceptable today.

Some believe that old films, TV shows, music or books with out-of-date, offensive elements should be hidden from public view. While others think they should be used as valuable tools that help us learn from the past.

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