Disney and Marvel plan to boycott Georgia if it passes its terrible anti-gay law.

Opponents of a new anti-gay law in Georgia might actually be able to stop it now that they have actual superheroes on their side.

HB 757 is the latest in a line of state "religious freedom" bills that provide faith-adjacent organizations more latitude to discriminate against LGBT Americans.


Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images.

According to a report in the Daily Beast, the proposed Georgia law "gives faith-based organizations the right to hire and fire people who violate their 'sincerely held religious beliefs,' as well as the right to refuse to rent facilities for events they find 'objectionable.'"

The bill has passed the state legislature and is awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature — or veto.

But Disney and Marvel, which are shooting "Guardians of the Galaxy 2" in the state, have announced they plan to boycott Georgia should the law go into effect.

Photo by Suhaimi Abdullah/Getty Images.

"Disney and Marvel are inclusive companies, and although we have had great experiences filming in Georgia, we will plan to take our business elsewhere should any legislation allowing discriminatory practices be signed into state law," a Disney spokesman said on Wednesday, according to Variety.

They're not the only ones.


Georgia-based Coca-Cola and Delta Airlines have also issued strong statements against the pending law. The NFL has said the state could lose out on future Super Bowls should the bill become law.

When Indiana tried to pass a similar law last year, a hugely diverse array of people rallied to defeat it.

A broad coalition of influential Americans and organizations, including governors of three states, mayors of five cities, activists, businesses, universities, sports conferences, and even church groups were instrumental in raising the specter of a mass boycott that ultimately helped persuade Gov. Mike Pence and legislators to narrow the scope of the law.

The reaction didn't come out of nowhere. Local and national LGBT rights groups painstakingly made the case against the bill to businesses for months so that when the time came to throw down, corporate America had their backs.

This time around, the response from big business was even bigger — and clearer. That's awesome progress.

A group takes a photo at Disney World's "Gay Days" in 2003. Photo by Chris Livingston/Getty Images.

Their message: Discrimination hurts our employees and our bottom line.

For that, companies like Disney and Marvel — and the activists who worked tirelessly to get them to pay attention — deserve a big round of applause.

More
Courtesy of Houseplant.

In America, one dumb mistake can hang over your head forever.

Nearly 30% of the American adult population — about 70 million people — have at least one criminal conviction that can prevent them from being treated equally when it comes to everything from job and housing opportunities to child custody.

Twenty million of these Americans have felony convictions that can destroy their chances of making a comfortable living and prevents them from voting out the lawmakers who imprisoned them.

Many of these convictions are drug-related and stem from the War on Drugs that began in the U.S. '80s. This war has unfairly targeted the minority community, especially African-Americans.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

Climate change is happening because the earth is warming at an accelerated rate, a significant portion of that acceleration is due to human activity, and not taking measures to mitigate it will have disastrous consequences for life as we know it.

In other words: Earth is heating up, it's kinda our fault, and if we don't fix it, we're screwed.

This is the consensus of the vast majority of the world's scientists who study such things for a living. Case closed. End of story.

How do we know this to be true? Because pretty much every reputable scientific organization on the planet has examined and endorsed these conclusions. Thousands of climate studies have been done, and multiple peer-reviewed studies have been done on those studies, showing that somewhere between 84 and 97 percent of active climate science experts support these conclusions. In fact, the majority of those studies put the consensus well above 90%.

Keep Reading Show less
Nature
via James Anderson

Two years ago, a tweet featuring the invoice for a fixed boiler went viral because the customer, a 91-year-old woman with leukemia, received the services for free.

"No charge for this lady under any circumstances," the invoice read. "We will be available 24 hours to help her and keep her as comfortable as possible."

The repair was done by James Anderson, 52, a father-of-five from Burnley, England. "James is an absolute star, it was overwhelming to see that it cost nothing," the woman's daughter told CNN.

Keep Reading Show less
Heroes

I live in a family with various food intolerances. Thankfully, none of them are super serious, but we are familiar with the challenges of finding alternatives to certain foods, constantly checking labels, and asking restaurants about their ingredients.

In our family, if someone accidentally eats something they shouldn't, it's mainly a bit of inconvenient discomfort. For those with truly life-threatening food allergies, the stakes are much higher.

I can't imagine the ongoing stress of deadly allergy, especially for parents trying to keep their little ones safe.

Keep Reading Show less
popular