+
Most Shared

Conan O’Brien laments the normalization of mass shootings in a somber monologue.

"How could there be a file of mass shooting remarks for a late night host?"

When Conan O'Brien walked into work the morning after the Las Vegas massacre, his head writer handed him a stack of papers. That act became the centerpiece of his monologue.

"He said, 'Here are the remarks you made after the Sandy Hook shooting and the Pulse night club attacks in Orlando. You might want to look at them to see what you might want to say tonight,'" O'Brien recounted of the conversation.

Mass shootings, the kind with the headline-grabbing intensity that compels even a late-night talk show host to address, have become so routine that O'Brien's staff actually had a file filled with his past responses to them. He was horrified.


"How could there be a file of mass shooting remarks for a late night host?" he asked, incredulously.

[rebelmouse-image 19531362 dam="1" original_size="450x253" caption=""How could there be a file of mass shooting remarks for a late night host?" All GIFs via Team Coco/YouTube." expand=1]"How could there be a file of mass shooting remarks for a late night host?" All GIFs via Team Coco/YouTube.

When O'Brien first started in late night, it was "practically unheard of" for a host to have to address this type of event.

A bevy of data show all the ways mass shootings have gotten more deadly and more frequent over the past several decades in the U.S. Over that same span of time, interestingly, Pew Research found that support for gun ownership over gun control has risen.

"When did this become a ritual?" asks O'Brien.

[rebelmouse-image 19531363 dam="1" original_size="450x253" caption=""When I began in 1993, occasions like this were extremely rare."" expand=1]"When I began in 1993, occasions like this were extremely rare."

[rebelmouse-image 19531364 dam="1" original_size="450x253" caption=""We're all tired of hearing reporters, let alone comics, discuss mass carnage in the most affluent and influential country in the history of the world."" expand=1]"We're all tired of hearing reporters, let alone comics, discuss mass carnage in the most affluent and influential country in the history of the world."

O'Brien doesn't have the answers — and neither do members of Congress, apparently — but we cannot simply accept that this is just something that happens and will always happen.

Will strict gun control measures put an end to mass shootings? Maybe. Maybe not. That doesn't mean that we shouldn't at least try to take action to make accessing these types of weapons more difficult for people who wish to use them to commit acts of mass death and destruction.

[rebelmouse-image 19531365 dam="1" original_size="450x253" caption=""I don't think it should be so easy for one demented person to kill so many people so quickly."" expand=1]"I don't think it should be so easy for one demented person to kill so many people so quickly."

That shouldn't be so much to ask.

Watch O'Brien's powerful monologue about the shocking normalcy of gun violence below.

Golden retriever has cutest reaction to sister walking.

Here at Upworthy we look for stories that will make you smile and warm your heart and, let’s face it, we could all use a little help in the smile department these days. When we ran across this ridiculously sweet story on The Dodo about a golden retriever and his little human sister, we simply had to share it with you. Taco is a 3-year-old golden retriever who has been lovingly waiting for his new baby sister, Vanora, to be able to play with him, and the day has finally come.

Keep ReadingShow less
Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

Chef broke cycle of "miserable leadership."

Anyone who's worked in a restaurant will know how intense it can be, especially in the kitchen. It’s hot, the cooks are stressed, someone’s always yelling about something and dishes, well, sometimes they end up broken. In upscale restaurants the pressure is even higher, so when this chef began to explain how he turned his kitchen around to be more harmonious and less chaotic, I stopped to listen.

Keep ReadingShow less
Education

Teacher of the year explains why he's leaving district in unforgettable 3-minute speech

"I'm leaving in hopes that I can regain the ability to do the job that I love."

Lee Allen

For all of our disagreements in modern American life, there are at least a few things most of us can agree on. One of those is the need for reform in public education. We don't all agree on the solutions but many of the challenges are undeniable: retaining great teachers, reducing classroom size and updating the focus of student curriculums to reflect the ever-changing needs of a globalized workforce.

And while parents, politicians and activists debate those remedies, one voice is all-too-often ignored: that of teachers themselves.

This is why a short video testimony from a teacher in the Atlanta suburb of Gwinnett County went viral recently. After all, it's hard to deny the points made by someone who was just named teacher of the year and used the occasion to announce why he will be leaving the very school district that just honored him with that distinction.

Keep ReadingShow less