+

Blessed with the voice of an angel, it's easy to forget Chris Cornell had the heart of one as well.

On May 17, 2017, the singer known for his work with bands like Soundgarden and Audioslave died a "sudden and unexpected" death following a Detroit concert. Cornell's death is being reported as an apparent suicide, leaving behind his three children and wife, Vicky.

As a rock star, he influenced the lives of millions with his art. Lesser known, however, is the life-changing work he did for others offstage.


A 2015 portrait of Cornell. Photo by Casey Curry/InVision/AP.

In April of this year, Cornell traveled to Greece to help refugees. That's just the kind of man he was, using his own resources to help others.

On April 10, Page Six reported Cornell departed from the London premiere of a film to go to an Athens refugee camp.

While there, Cornell met "refugee families and [heard] firsthand the harrowing stories of their escapes, the separation of children from their parents and the stress and uncertainty of day-to-day life," the news outlet reported.

Since 2012, Cornell helped lead the Chris & Vicky Cornell Foundation, a charity dedicated to raising funds to support children facing homelessness, abuse, poverty, and neglect. He'd often set aside a portion of his tour income to go toward the foundation, which would then go to support a variety of child-specific causes.

In the weeks leading up to his death, Cornell was making the rounds on TV shows ranging from "CBS This Morning" to NBC's "The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon" performing the title track from "The Promise," a film about the Armenian genocide, an issue close to his heart. All proceeds from the song's sales go to the International Rescue Committee.

The man who inspired countless people to pick up a guitar and start singing can help inspire the world to do something just as important: pay it forward.

"I was lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time to make a career doing something I love," Cornell said, according to a story with Alternative Nation. "Not every kid gets those opportunities. I’m in a fortunate position to use music to support important causes that help foster change."

If you or someone you know is struggling with thoughts of suicide, please reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

Keep ReadingShow less

RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


Keep ReadingShow less