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Canceling out the harmful effects of sitting can be done without even breaking a sweat.

When I realized how dangerous too much sitting can be, I got to searching, and this is what I found.

Canceling out the harmful effects of sitting can be done without even breaking a sweat.

Here are nine ways you can counteract the affects of sitting.

Let's review their suggestions!


1. Just stand up at regular intervals.

Need a reminder? There's an app for that (iOS or Android)!

2. Use a standing desk.

They can be expensive, but they don't have to be. There are models out there that just sit on top of a standard-height desk that cost less than $50. (Try to expense it, OK?)

3. Drink more water (so you have to pee).

My favorite method! Just keep a water bottle next to your desk. Not a fan of plain water? Who said it has to be plain?!

4. Go talk to someone instead of email, IM, or text.

Unless your email is terrible. Then maybe just re-evaluate in general.

5. Get up instead of rolling to the thing you need on the other side of the room.

You are better than this.

6. Try a stability ball.

Ehh ... the science says this one is not so great. It doesn't really activate your muscles or improve your posture, and it will probably make you uncomfortable. But if it you've tried it and it works for you, go ahead and get your ball chair on!

7. Park at the back of the parking lot.

This won't break up a sedentary workday. But if you don't get any regular exercise in your life, just adding that few minutes of walking can add up to hours of activity over the course of a year.

8. Stand up during phone calls.

They can't see you ... yet. So why not loosen up that head, shoulders, knees, and toes?

9. Use a pedometer.

There's a lot of hoohah about smartwatches right now that cost a milliondy dollars. Bypass all that nonsense if you just want to see how much you're moving in a day. You can get a pedometer for as little as $8 (of course, more than that gets you more bells and whistles) or download a free step-counter app.

Bonus: 10. Have walking meetings.

OK, this one is mine. Sitting or standing across from someone is a literal face-off. But sitting or standing next to some feels collaborative — like you're on the same team. Try doing a walking meeting, especially if you think the meeting could get tense because pretty much everything about walking outside reduces stress.

Which one are you going to try?

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less
Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less