On "The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore," everyone's favorite science guy Bill Nye broke down exactly why racism is completely and utterly pointless ... with science.

His bottom line?

There's no such thing as race.


At least, not biologically. Which is why there is absolutely zero justification for a system that privileges white people over people of color — aka racism.

We're all one species. Our skin tone varies quite a bit, facial features vary, and some of us inexplicably like the band Rush, but those are about the biggest differences.

Nye puts it brilliantly.

... and ...

... get together, and she gets pregnant, it's pretty clear what's going to happen nine months later.

Images by "The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore."

Seems pretty basic.

Although Nye dismisses racism in a few pithy words, he does talk about tribalism quite a bit and how it's totally a real thing. Which begs the question...

What exactly is tribalism?

Via Giphy.

Basically, it's the whole idea that there's an "us" and a "them."

As one writer explains:

We identify ourselves as members of all sorts of tribes; our families, political parties, race, gender, social organizations. We even identify tribally just based on where we live. Go Celtics, go Red Sox, go U.S. Olympic team! One study asked people whether, if they had a fatal disease, would they prefer a life-saving diagnosis from a computer that was 1,000 miles away, or the exact same diagnosis from a computer in their town, and a large majority preferred the same information if the source … a machine … was local.David Ropeik, Big Think

Evidence shows that humans have an innate tendency to divide the world into in-groups and out-groups. For much of human history, these groups have been largely defined by skin color. Which has led to non-white people getting the short end of the stick (to, um, put it mildly).

But there's also evidence that we, as humans, can rise above this. And that changing our culture can help us get there.

We are humans, after all. With brains. That think.

Sometimes. Via Giphy.

Let's use 'em.

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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