Bill Nye doesn't pull punches when asked if racism has any basis in nature.

On "The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore," everyone's favorite science guy Bill Nye broke down exactly why racism is completely and utterly pointless ... with science.

His bottom line?

There's no such thing as race.


At least, not biologically. Which is why there is absolutely zero justification for a system that privileges white people over people of color — aka racism.

We're all one species. Our skin tone varies quite a bit, facial features vary, and some of us inexplicably like the band Rush, but those are about the biggest differences.

Nye puts it brilliantly.

... and ...

... get together, and she gets pregnant, it's pretty clear what's going to happen nine months later.

Images by "The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore."

Seems pretty basic.

Although Nye dismisses racism in a few pithy words, he does talk about tribalism quite a bit and how it's totally a real thing. Which begs the question...

What exactly is tribalism?

Via Giphy.

Basically, it's the whole idea that there's an "us" and a "them."

As one writer explains:

We identify ourselves as members of all sorts of tribes; our families, political parties, race, gender, social organizations. We even identify tribally just based on where we live. Go Celtics, go Red Sox, go U.S. Olympic team! One study asked people whether, if they had a fatal disease, would they prefer a life-saving diagnosis from a computer that was 1,000 miles away, or the exact same diagnosis from a computer in their town, and a large majority preferred the same information if the source … a machine … was local.David Ropeik, Big Think

Evidence shows that humans have an innate tendency to divide the world into in-groups and out-groups. For much of human history, these groups have been largely defined by skin color. Which has led to non-white people getting the short end of the stick (to, um, put it mildly).

But there's also evidence that we, as humans, can rise above this. And that changing our culture can help us get there.

We are humans, after all. With brains. That think.

Sometimes. Via Giphy.

Let's use 'em.

Courtesy of Verizon
True

If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via @Todd_Spence / Twitter

Seven years ago, Bill Murray shared a powerful story about the importance of art. The revelation came during a discussion at the National Gallery in London for the release of 2014's "The Monuments Men." The film is about a troop of soldiers on a mission to recover art stolen by the Nazis.

After his first time performing on stage in Chicago, Murray was so upset with himself that he contemplated taking his own life.

"I wasn't very good, and I remember my first experience, I was so bad I just walked out — out onto the street and just started walking," he said.

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