A star from 'Glee' chats with his family about moving clear across the world (and it's super cute).
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Carnegie Corporation of New York

Here's Harry Shum Jr. — dancer, actor, and singer.


Harry smiles at his pops. All images from Welcome US.


Recognize him? Of course you do. That's 'cause he had a minor role in "Step Up 3D," the third installment in the epic "Step Up" trilogy we all know and love.

... No? Not that? OK fine. He also had a much bigger regular role on the ever-so-popular show "Glee." He was Mike Chang, the hands-down, no-questions-asked best male dancer in the entire series (in, like, everyone's opinion).

If Harry said, "I was born in a country [that] starts with a 'C'," what would you guess?

Where d'ya think this wee little Harry was born?

If you guessed Costa Rica, *ding ding ding!* you're RIGHT!

Let's back up and take a look at Harry's story, which his parents explain in this awesome short video made by Welcome US and directed by Paola Mendoza.


See, Harry's parents were born in different parts of China.

Then they moved from China to Costa Rica, where their three kids were born.

Then when Harry (the youngest sibling) was 6, the family moved to California.

Harry grew up with awesome influences from three different cultures: Chinese, Costa Rican, and American.

How cool is that!?

He talks about trying to learn English and Cantonese at the same time as a kid, after having learned Spanish as a first language. Um, wow.

Harry with his sisters.

Harry explains that he feels mostly Asian-American because he was so young when the family moved away from Costa Rica. But he's learned a lot of things about Latin culture from his older sisters.

As a kid, he was always really into performing. But he says, "it took [being] here in America" to know that he could "actually go and perform around these people that are incredibly talented."

Harry's love of performing grew over the years until it became his career — eventually leading to his most famous role on "Glee."

People come from all over the place, and everyone has a different story.

(Sorry, not sorry, for the cheesefest — it's true.)

Harry's not just American. He's also not just Costa Rican. Aaanndd — you guessed it — he's not just Chinese. He's a little bit of everything. And it's that little bit of everything that's led him down the path to where he is today.

And, if ya ask me, that's pretty darn great.

Harry performs a choreographed dance to a voice-over about being shy as a kid. See the dance here.

via Fox 5 / YouTube

Back in February, northern Virginia was experiencing freezing temperatures, so FOX 5 DC's Bob Barnard took to the streets to get the low down. His report opens with him having fun with some Leesburg locals and trying his hand at scraping ice off their parked cars.

But at about the 1:50 mark, he was interrupted by an unaccompanied puppy running down the street towards the news crew.

The dog had a collar but there was no owner in sight.

Barnard stopped everything he was doing to pick the dog up off the freezing road to keep it safe. "Forget the people we talked to earlier, I want to get to know this dog," he told his fellow reporters back in the warm newsroom.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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