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A Lot Of Kids Find This Funny. You Might Find It Horrifying.

How could something so appalling become so ordinary, and worse, so comedic?

A Lot Of Kids Find This Funny. You Might Find It Horrifying.

Hey you. Yes you, Internet person. We need to talk.


Do you enjoy TV shows like "Family Guy" or video games like "Grand Theft Auto"?

You're definitely not alone. Millions of people consume these media because they're fun and entertaining. But that entertainment comes at the expense of very real and very disturbing problems.

The kind of problems that, if you ever were a victim or knew a victim, would show these programs, games, and music videos to be horrifying, even triggering. Even if you don't know someone like that, the growing research base suggests that these media have an effect on you, Internet person. Here are some actual findings from a study in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence (emphasis my own):

this exploratory study found that a video game depicting sexual objectification of women and violence against women resulted in statistically significant increased rape myths acceptance (rape-supportive attitudes) for male study participants but not for female participants.

Experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that under well-controlled conditions, the observation of violent scenes observed in the media causes children to behave more aggressively. Static observational studies have demonstrated that the amount of violence television observed by a child is positively related to the child's current aggressivity . . . The data available from longitudinal studies provide additional support for the hypothesis that television violence viewing leads to the development of aggressive behavior.

At this point, you might be thinking, "Sure, that could be an issue, but TV, video games, and music videos aren't that bad anymore. They're not that graphic." Watch the following clips and get back to me on that.

TRIGGER WARNING: Scenes of violence against women.

What do you think after watching these? Give this a share if you think the message here is one more folks need to see.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.