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A high school English teacher quit her job to run a food truck. But this isn't an ordinary one.

Food trucks deliver amazing grilled cheese sandwiches, tacos, and donuts. And also social change.

What if we could help people who have been released from prison actually stay out of prison?

That's exactly what Drive Change is working hard to accomplish. NationSwell featured the nonprofit in a short video, which you can scroll down to watch.

Drive Change builds and operates food trucks.


Jordyn Lexton, Drive Change's founder, used to teach high school English to incarcerated 16-, 17-, and 18-year-olds — all of whom were convicted as adults — at Rikers Island in New York. When she saw how bleak the future looked for them once they were released from prison, she decided to do something about it.

She left teaching behind and started the nonprofit. What makes the organization special is that it hires formerly incarcerated youth to operate the trucks, giving them an opportunity to earn money and gain job skills. Both of these things help keep people who have been incarcerated from returning to prison.

The Snowday food truck, Drive Change's first, makes $15,000 a month.

The profits are put right back into Drive Change, which hopes to expand its operations to help more people. Drive Change's eight employees, all of whom start at $11 an hour, operate the truck, selling food inspired by maple syrup. (Yum!)

"Our plan is hopefully to make this a national model ... because unfortunately, there is not a shortage of formerly incarcerated youth across the country."
— Drive Change head chef Roy Waterman

Awesome, right?! This is a case of someone seeing a problem, coming up with a solution, and taking action.

And the problem is quite big.

The U.S. has the highest percentage of its population incarcerated in the developed world.

That's a daunting fact. But you know what's even more daunting? Department of Justice statistics show that over 75% of people who are released from prison end up right back there within five years.

In New York, 16- and 17-year-olds are automatically sentenced as adults. 70% of NYC teens reoffend within three years of release.

And this is exactly why programs such as Drive Change are so important. Imagine how much that 70% figure could be reduced by offering them job opportunities, skills, and hope.

You can watch this video to see how Drive Change is making a difference.

Individuals like Fred Coleman have a much brighter future thanks to Drive Change!

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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via Pixabay

Giving a high-five to a kid who needs one.

John Rosemond, a 74-year-old columnist and family psychologist, has folks up in arms after he wrote a column about why he never gives children high-fives. The article, “Living With Children: You shouldn't high-five a child” was published on the Omaha World-Herald’s website on October 2.

The post reads like a verse from the “Get Off My Lawn” bible and posits that one should only share a high-five with someone who is one's equal.

"I will not slap the upraised palm of a person who is not my peer, and a peer is someone over age 21, emancipated, employed and paying their own way," the columnist wrote. "The high-five is NOT appropriate between doctor and patient, judge and defendant, POTUS and a person not old enough to vote (POTUS and anyone, for that matter), employer and employee, parent and child, grandparent and grandchild."

Does he ask to see a paystub before he high-fives adults?

“Respect for adults is important to a child’s character development, and the high-five is not compatible with respect,” he continues. “It is to be reserved for individuals of equal, or fairly equal, status.”

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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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