7 social media dads who show how cool fatherhood really is.

There was time when "dad on Facebook" meant someone logging in once a week to make sure his kids weren't getting into any mischief.

That isn't the case anymore, not by a long shot (although we definitely still keep an eye on our kids).

There are are thousands of amazing dads on social media who are spreading great messages on modern fatherhood, but I want to recognize these seven men for the diverse work they do.


1. The dad who illustrates what parenthood is like using "fowl language."

In the summer of 2013, Brian Gordon created a comic called "Fowl Language" as a way to vent his frustrations about the day-to-day challenges of parenthood (don't worry, most of his comics do not contain any obscenities). I'll go out on a limb by saying you're not going to find a more relatable set of parenting comics anywhere.

Like this one.

An original comic from Brian's Fowl Language website, used with permission.

What's awesome about him?

You gotta love a guy who has the courage to follow his dreams.

"After surviving several rounds of layoffs, it finally ended up being my turn this past June," Brian told me. "With few other options, I decided to pursue my dream job as a full-time cartoonist. After some recent high-profile exposure from sites like Upworthy, I was able to grow my audience to the point where I could begin to provide for my family."

Due to that exposure, Brian received a book deal. Be on the lookout for "Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting" hitting a book store near you in March 2016. Until then, you can follow his fowl adventures on Facebook and Instagram.

2 and 3. The guys who show the world how to be a dad.

Photo of Charlie and Andy of How to Be a Dad used with permission.

Charlie Capen and Andy Herald are two sleep-deprived dads living in Southern California figuring out this fatherhood thing with their respective families. How to Be a Dad is not so much a "how-to" but a "how-not-to" for dads, moms, soon-to-be dads, and even those with no plans of procreating whatsoever.

What's awesome about them?

In the wake of so many parenting experts and gurus, these guys decided to offer humor and in-the-trenches satire as a counter to all of seriousness and perfectionism. They've been on countless television shows and websites spreading their daddy goodness all over the world.


Be sure to check them out on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

4. The vigilante of fatherhood.

Forget the streets of Gotham City, BatDad does his work at home. Photo from Blake Wilson, used with permission.

Blake Wilson is a father of four who lives in Georgia and is the guy behind BatDad. Basically, picture Batman as a dad with an incredible sense of humor.

What's awesome about him?

The dude is absolutely hilarious, and I'm not the only one who thinks that. Blake has millions of followers on Facebook and Vine. If you're in need of a laugh, just check out his work. You will not be disappointed.

5. The man who wants every father to be an "all in" dad.

Photo of Josh Levs used with permission.

After 20 years of reporting for NPR and CNN, Josh Levs, a father of three, focuses his new book "All In" on dispelling myths about today’s dads and moms and explaining the necessity of new policies such as paid family leave.

What's awesome about him?

Josh is truly a pioneer. He tells his own story of taking on a policy at CNN's parent company Time Warner that prevented him from being able to care for his newborn preemie daughter and sick wife.

As a result of his legal action and the publicity surrounding them, the company revolutionized its policy, making it much better for dads and moms. The change made the company better and stronger, which will open the doors for other companies to follow suit.

Learn more about him and his work by following him on Twitter.

6. The activist dad.

Photo of Whit Honea used with permission.

Whit Honea is the author of "The Parents’ Phrase Book," the co-founder of Dads 4 Change, and the social media director for the annual Dad 2.0 Summit. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife and two sons.

What's awesome about him?

Whit is also a pioneer. Dads 4 Change uses its social channels to provide a platform for families to share and connect with the causes and charitable organizations that they're passionate about as well as a space to celebrate the craft of storytelling via the personal narratives that shape and inspire their activism.

It’s about dads using their voice, be it writing, video, or other, to promote their actions and vice versa, all of which leads us so much closer to the common goal of making a happier world for everyone.

7. The dad who will teach you how to do your daughter's 'do.

Phil and his daughter Emma, used with permission.

In case you missed it, Phil Morgese is a single dad who's a whiz when it comes to styling his daughter's hair.

Here's a quick sample of his work.

Emma showing off one of her daddy's creations. Photo from Phil Morgese, used with permission.

Now he wants to help other dads learn, too.

He encourages men to visit his Daddy Daughter Hair Factory Facebook page, where he hopes dads will feel comfortable to ask questions, seek support, and receive advice. He's also in the process of creating an online course so he can pass on his learnings virtually to parents who need help.

What's awesome about him?

All of his classes are completely free.

"If I charged for the class, it would be viewed as a business instead of a service to the community," Phil said. "I want to serve the community and do my small part to make the world a better place."

This is just a small sample of the great dads who use their influence to improve the world.

It could be a laugh, a tip, or an inspirational stance, but these guys are showing everyone how cool it is to be a dad.

The good news for all of us is that people are listening.

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