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Some people say that you shouldn't meet your heroes because they might disappoint you.

But if you believe that, clearly your hero isn't John Williams.

You may not know John Williams by name, but you've undoubtedly heard some of his legendary film scores.


From "Jaws"...

GIF via "Jaws."

...and the "Indiana Jones" movies...

GIF via "Raiders of the Lost Ark."

...to a galaxy far, far, away...

GIF via "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."

Williams is one of the most critically acclaimed and prolific film composers of the modern era. Generations of fans admire him for his astonishing talent and contribution to film.

And that's why two of those fans decided to deliver a surprising tribute to him:

Two musicians teamed up to play the theme from "Star Wars" ... outside of Williams' house.

Flugelhorn player Michael Miller (better known as Mickle) and trumpeter Bryce Hayashi performed a duet on the sidewalk in front of Williams' home, and it was beautiful.

It was so good, in fact, that less than a minute in to the performance, Williams himself poked his head out the front door and gave a small wave.


GIF via bigeyezzzzzzz/YouTube.

And though it wasn't expected or necessary, the 84-year-old composer came down to the sidewalk to introduce himself and meet the musicians., too

GIF via bigeyezzzzzzz/YouTube.

Ever the artist, he even complimented their ability to hit the high notes.

GIF via bigeyezzzzzzz/YouTube.

The whole experience is a delightful 95-second reminder that using your talents and gifts can make the world a little brighter.

Whether you're an accomplished composer, a middle-school musician, or something else entirely, let your light shine. You never know whose afternoon, day, or life you may affect just by being yourself.

The same goes for extending gratitude to the people who've helped and inspired you, too. If you get the opportunity, say thanks, and keep the good going.

Of course, some celebrities are uncomfortable with this kind of attention, so we can't assume that every hero of ours will come out to the sidewalk when we stop by.

But you can (and should) live vicariously through Mickle and Bryce by watching their video of the performance.

Dare you not to hum along.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


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