2 fans took a risk by showing up at their hero's house. Then he surprised them.

Some people say that you shouldn't meet your heroes because they might disappoint you.

But if you believe that, clearly your hero isn't John Williams.

You may not know John Williams by name, but you've undoubtedly heard some of his legendary film scores.


From "Jaws"...

GIF via "Jaws."

...and the "Indiana Jones" movies...

GIF via "Raiders of the Lost Ark."

...to a galaxy far, far, away...

GIF via "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."

Williams is one of the most critically acclaimed and prolific film composers of the modern era. Generations of fans admire him for his astonishing talent and contribution to film.

And that's why two of those fans decided to deliver a surprising tribute to him:

Two musicians teamed up to play the theme from "Star Wars" ... outside of Williams' house.

Flugelhorn player Michael Miller (better known as Mickle) and trumpeter Bryce Hayashi performed a duet on the sidewalk in front of Williams' home, and it was beautiful.

It was so good, in fact, that less than a minute in to the performance, Williams himself poked his head out the front door and gave a small wave.


GIF via bigeyezzzzzzz/YouTube.

And though it wasn't expected or necessary, the 84-year-old composer came down to the sidewalk to introduce himself and meet the musicians., too

GIF via bigeyezzzzzzz/YouTube.

Ever the artist, he even complimented their ability to hit the high notes.

GIF via bigeyezzzzzzz/YouTube.

The whole experience is a delightful 95-second reminder that using your talents and gifts can make the world a little brighter.

Whether you're an accomplished composer, a middle-school musician, or something else entirely, let your light shine. You never know whose afternoon, day, or life you may affect just by being yourself.

The same goes for extending gratitude to the people who've helped and inspired you, too. If you get the opportunity, say thanks, and keep the good going.

Of course, some celebrities are uncomfortable with this kind of attention, so we can't assume that every hero of ours will come out to the sidewalk when we stop by.

But you can (and should) live vicariously through Mickle and Bryce by watching their video of the performance.

Dare you not to hum along.

Naomi Osaka was only 20 years old when she won the U.S. Open tournament, and she is the first Asian player to hold the highest singles ranking. The tennis star moved to the U.S. from Japan at age three and she has held both Japanese and American citizenship.

Her U.S. citizenship has been a topic of discussion as the Japanese exemption that allows her to hold both passports expired at age 22—which Osaka turned in 2019. At that time, she announced she would choose to give up her U.S. citizenship to keep her Japanese citizenship and compete for Japan in the 2020 Olympics. However, Osaka has said that she feels "more like a global citizen" than one particular nationality—a sentiment supported by her latest endeavor.

In partnership with Nike and Laureus Sport for Good, Osaka launched a program to support girls in sports in Japan last year. Her Play Academy is committed to leveling the playing field for girls through physical play and sports, giving girls opportunities and encouragement to get moving.

Now, she is expanding Play Academy to Los Angeles, where she currently lives and trains, as well as to Haiti, where her father is from.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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