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1 Comment You Might Wanna Stop Making ... 'Cause It's Actually Kind Of An Insult

Hearing it made him want to explode. Here's what he did instead.

This is "Scooter" Magruder. People have told him on more occasions than one that he "talks white."

But what exactly does that mean?


Magruder remembers a time when "talking white" wasn't even a thing.

"Let's go way back in the day when we were three-fifths humans ... during the slave trade. Before the Bloods and the Crips, gang banging and AKs, nobody talked white or black. They talked slave master and slave."

The founders wrote the three-fifths compromise into the U.S. Constitution in 1787 to determine how slaves would be accounted for with legislative representation. It was decided that each enslaved black person would count as only three-fifths of a person. The clause was repealed in 1865 after the Civil War and the adoption of the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery.

But "talking white" still wasn't a thing even after slavery was outlawed.

"Things changed after the Civil War, luckily. Now you weren't talking white. You were just being uppity."

He's just waxing poetic there, and I love it. The bald eagle was actually named the national bird of the United States in 1782, almost a century before Jim Crow laws — named after an incredibly racist song-and-dance from the 1820s — were enacted to keep blacks separate and unequal in a post-slavery U.S. But you get the point.

If you haven't already caught on, "talking white" is not a thing.

And to say it to someone is to compare them to caricatures that you've somehow come to believe represent millions of people.

Needless to say, that would be ridiculous. Scholars would call that an ethnocentric viewpoint, which is basically the passing of judgment on other racial or ethnic groups that you see as inferior, perhaps without even realizing it.

"Talking proper isn't white. Talking black isn't ghetto," says Magruder.

BOOM.

Watch Magruder's impassioned delivery below:

I live in Washington, the state with the first official outbreak of COVID-19 in the U.S. While my family lives several hours from Seattle, it was alarming to be near the epicenter—especially early in the pandemic when we knew even less about the coronavirus than we know now.

As tracking websites went up and statistics started pouring in, things looked hairy for Washington. But not for long. We could have and should have shut everything down faster than we did, but Governor Inslee took the necessary steps to keep the virus from flying completely out of control. He's consistently gotten heat from all sides, but in general he listened to the infectious disease experts and followed the lead of public health officials—which is exactly what government needs to do in a pandemic.

As a result, we've spent the past several months watching Washington state drop from the #1 hotspot down to 23rd in the nation (as of today) for total coronavirus cases. In cases per million population, we're faring even better at number 38. We have a few counties where outbreaks are pretty bad, and cases have slowly started to rise as the state has reopened—which was to be expected—but I've felt quite satisfied with how it's been handled at the state level. The combination of strong state leadership and county-by-county reopenings has born statistically impressive results—especially considering the fact that we didn't have the lead time that other states did to prepare for the outbreak.

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