Yep, Chrissy Teigen is still being as real as it gets after giving birth again.

Chrissy Teigen and John Legend just welcomed their baby boy, Miles, into the world.

"This is Miles Theodore Stephens," Teigen captioned a photo posted on May 17, 2018. "We are drowning in his little peeps and nuzzles. Our household feels overwhelmed with love."

Image via Chrissy Teigen/Instagram.


Don't let the adorable pic and delightful caption above fool you though: Teigen's still being as real as it gets when it comes to postpartum life.

Hours after Miles' Instagram debut, she posted a slightly less magical shot sporting post-birth underwear, giving a shout-out to comedian Ali Wong for cleverly pointing out the clothing item looks just like the material Korean pears are wrapped in at the grocery store.

Image via Chrissy Teigen/Instagram.

On May 20, Teigen threw a (lighthearted) dig at Legend for attending an awards show while she was at home fulfilling her less glamorous mommy duties.

"Wow," she wrote from the couch, wrapped in a blanket with Miles in her arms. "Didn’t u just have a baby John [shake my head] go take care of it !!!!!! disgusting"

Then there was this tweet — an incredibly honest revelation about the birthing process. "I can confirm postpartum life is 90% better when you don't rip to your butthole," she confirmed.

(The replies to that one were particularly amazing. "My baby boy will be 25 in August and my butt still hurts," one follower chimed in.)

None of this should be surprising. Teigen's been dropping mommy candor since giving birth to her now 2-year-old, Luna.

Luna — like every little one — has had her rascal moments. And Teigen's been happy to share many of them with fans.

Because many parents have been there, done that.

But Teigen's relatable mom life has gone beyond the jokes and lighthearted digs at daddy. She's opened up about the more serious sides of parenthood as well.

Last year, Teigen penned a powerful essay in Glamour about her struggles with postpartum depression.

"How can I feel this way when everything is so great?" she wrote.

"When I wasn’t in the studio, I never left the house. I mean, never. Not even a tiptoe outside. I’d ask people who came inside why they were wet. Was it raining? How would I know — I had every shade closed. Most days were spent on the exact same spot on the couch and rarely would I muster up the energy to make it upstairs for bed. John would sleep on the couch with me, sometimes four nights in a row. I started keeping robes and comfy clothes in the pantry so I wouldn’t have to go upstairs when John went to work. There was a lot of spontaneous crying."

After being diagnosed with postpartum depression and anxiety, Teigen began taking an anti-depressant and opening up to family and friends about what she was going through.

"I remember being so exhausted but happy to know that we could finally get on the path of getting better," she wrote. "John had that same excitement."

Sure, many aspects of Teigen's life aren't ordinary or relatable. She's wealthy and a famous model, cookbook author, and TV personality. Her (well-deserved) career has afforded her many luxuries most of us will never benefit from. But that's why her parenting candor — both the funny anecdotes and her more sobering revelations — are all the more important.

If a star like Teigen's going through it, you know you're not alone.

More
'Good Morning America'

Over 35 million people have donated their marrow worldwide, according to the World Marrow Donor Day, which took place September 21. That's 35,295,060 who've selflessly given a part of themselves so another person can have a shot at life. World Marrow Donor Day celebrates and thanks those millions of people who have donated cells for blood stem cells or marrow transplants. But how do you really say thank you to someone who saved your life?

Eighteen-year-old Jack Santos wasn't aware that he was sick."I was getting a lot of nosebleeds but I didn't really think I felt anything wrong," Jack told ABC news. During his yearly checkup, his bloodwork revealed that he had aplastic anemia, a rare non-cancerous blood disease in which there are not enough stem cells in the bone marrow for it to make new blood cells. There are 300 to 900 new cases of aplastic anemia in America each year. It is believed that aplastic anemia is an auto-immune disorder, but in 75% of cases, the cause of the disease is unknown.

It wasn't easy for his family to see him struggle with the illness. "I didn't want to see him go through something like this," Shelby, his older sister, said. "It was terrifying, but we were ready for whatever brought with it at the time."

Keep Reading Show less
Family
Courtesy of Houseplant.

In America, one dumb mistake can hang over your head forever.

Nearly 30% of the American adult population — about 70 million people — have at least one criminal conviction that can prevent them from being treated equally when it comes to everything from job and housing opportunities to child custody.

Twenty million of these Americans have felony convictions that can destroy their chances of making a comfortable living and prevents them from voting out the lawmakers who imprisoned them.

Many of these convictions are drug-related and stem from the War on Drugs that began in the U.S. '80s. This war has unfairly targeted the minority community, especially African-Americans.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

After over a hundred days protests and demonstrations over basic freedoms in Hong Kong, the city has been ground down both emotionally and economically. So, the government there is looking for leading PR firms to rehabilitate its somewhat authoritarian image with the rest of the world. Only one problem, they're all saying no.

Keep Reading Show less
Democracy
via James Anderson

Two years ago, a tweet featuring the invoice for a fixed boiler went viral because the customer, a 91-year-old woman with leukemia, received the services for free.

"No charge for this lady under any circumstances," the invoice read. "We will be available 24 hours to help her and keep her as comfortable as possible."

The repair was done by James Anderson, 52, a father-of-five from Burnley, England. "James is an absolute star, it was overwhelming to see that it cost nothing," the woman's daughter told CNN.

Keep Reading Show less
Heroes