You've heard of nanotech, right? It's basically working with things that are really, really tiny.*

When you zoom into something to a super small scale, really surprising things can happen.

Take gold. We like it because it lasts a lifetime (and longer)! It makes good watches, rings, and coins because it doesn't react with oxygen and become tarnished or corroded. It just sits there, a gleaming symbol of never-ending love and power.


But if you zoom in much, much more closely to a tiny particle of gold, it transforms to something very different!

One of your grandparents can wear a gold ring that doesn't change in a lifetime. But up close, gold becomes a much more exciting scene.

Scientists have been able to attach molecules of drugs to surfaces of gold at this scale and use gold as a delivery vehicle to take medicines to particular sites in the body. Vroom!

Rod-shaped nano gold particles can be loaded up with antibodies that bond only to cancer cells. The nano gold can by made to oscillate via infrared light until — boom! Bad day for cancer cell.

Zoom in even farther, and things get really weird.

Super tiny pieces of gold can be used to change carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide. That kind of magic suggests that maybe we can use gold to make better breathing apparatus for fire fighters, for example, or to purify water.

We're already surrounded by products using nanotech. Nano silver in clothing and packaging fights bacteria that makes things stinky. Nano titanium dioxide makes sunscreens, paints, and other coatings more reflective, helping shield your body and your house from the sun.

These wondrous tiny things can also easily pass through cell membranes, taking new materials where they've never gone before. So, like with all new technologies, we do want to be careful to research the risks as well as the benefits as we develop and deploy it.

That said, the future looks pretty sparkly for nano gold!


*For an excellent overview of scale check out this video that zooms from the smallest thing we know to the largest. You hit nano scale at about 0:39.

via Jody Danielle Fisher / Facebook

Breast milk is an incredibly magical food. The wonderful thing is that it's produced by a collaboration between mother and baby.

British mother Jody Danielle Fisher shared the miracle of this collaboration on Facebook recently after having her 13-month-old child vaccinated.

In the post, she compared the color of her breast milk before and after the vaccination, to show how a baby's reaction to the vaccine has a direct effect on her mother's milk production.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Picsea on Unsplash
True

It is said that once you've seen something, you can't unsee it. This is exactly what is happening in America right now. We have collectively watched the pot of racial tension boil over after years of looking the other way, insisting that hot water doesn't exist, pretending not to notice the smoke billowing out from every direction.

Ignoring a problem doesn't make it go away—it prolongs resolution. There's a whole lot of harm to be remedied and damage to be repaired as a result of racial injustice, and it's up to all of us to figure out how to do that. Parents, in particular, are recognizing the importance of raising anti-racist children; if we are unable to completely eradicate racism, maybe the next generation will.

How can parents ensure that the next generation will actively refuse to perpetuate systems and behaviors embedded in racism? The most obvious answer is to model it. Take for example, professional tennis player Serena Williams and her husband, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Mahir Uysal on Unsplash

Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

Keep Reading Show less

Believe it or not, there has been a lot of controversy lately about how people cook rice. According to CNN, the "outrage" was a reaction to a clip Malaysian comedian Nigel Ng posted as one of his personas known as Uncle Roger.

It was a hilarious (and harmless) satire about the method chef Hersha Patel used to cook rice on the show BBC Food.


Keep Reading Show less