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Will Smith weighs in on the 2016 election, racism, and Islamophobia.

"What makes someone evil is they don’t think they’re evil. They think they’re doing good."

Will Smith weighs in on the 2016 election, racism, and Islamophobia.

While promoting his latest film, "Suicide Squad," Will Smith is using his platform in a unique way.

In the film, Smith plays an assassin named Deadshot. On screen, you'll find him in the middle of a hail of bullets, explosions, and destruction. For example:

GIF from Warner Bros. Pictures/YouTube.


Smith's character is, technically, a "bad guy," which is a major change of pace for the movie star, who you'll usually find filling the role of a film's protagonist. Though he's a "bad guy" on the screen this time around, his recent comments during a number of press events show that in real life, he's still a hero.

Speaking at a press stop in Dubai, Smith addressed an important social issue that seems only to be getting worse: Islamophobia.

During a recent press conference, the summer blockbuster star talked about why he feels a personal responsibility to speak out on issues of racial and religious discrimination.

GIFs by The Associated Press/YouTube.

For him, that means trying to balance out some of the most incendiary rhetoric from a certain presidential candidate *cough* Donald Trump *cough* that many consider to be anti-Muslim.

Smith says he believes he has a responsibility to speak out so that "when [people] see a black man, the energy that we had can be what they remember." He added: "They have to know that your black skin won't hurt them."

Margot Robbie and Will Smith attend the European premiere of "Suicide Squad" in London. Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images.

In another interview, Smith got in another subtle dig at Trump when discussing how he got into the "bad guy" mindset:

"What makes someone evil is they don’t think they’re evil. They think they’re doing good," Smith told Access Hollywood. "Like, they actually think it’s OK to call a woman a 'fat pig' on television. They think it’s OK. That’s what makes them evil."

While it seems pretty obvious who Smith won't be voting for this November, he seems confident that he's not alone.

GIF by The Associated Press/YouTube.

GIF by The Associated Press/YouTube.

But surely, it's nothing personal.

OK, this is just another GIF from the movie. GIF from Warner Bros. Pictures/YouTube.

You can watch Will Smith share more of this thoughts on the dangers of Islamophobia in the video below:

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.