When men were edited out of these images, it revealed a powerful truth about equality.

Who run the world? Girls.

Or girls and women to be exact, but who am I to argue with Queen B?

We women are busy running countries, leading companies, piloting technological and medical breakthroughs, dominating the world of sport, and in many cases, serving as primary caregivers for the next generation.



It's not easy being awesome, but somehow we manage. Right, Serena? Photo by Alex Goodlett/Getty Images.

But a troublesome new video from Elle U.K. illustrates the disparity between men and women in places of power.

From politics to Hollywood, women are often represented by a single voice in the room. The numbers don't lie. Women are 37% of MBA graduates, but only 4.6% of Fortune 500 CEOs. And this phenomenon is all too easy to see when men are edited out of the photos.


All GIFs by Elle U.K.

Having representation in places of power and influence is the only way women will achieve equality on a global scale. Because as the saying goes, when you don't have a seat at the table, it usually means you're on the menu.

The video was created as part of Elle U.K.'s #morewomen initiative.

Too often, successful women are portrayed as one-offs or exceptions. They're the take-no-prisoners alpha females who only reach new heights by walking on the backs of other women. In reality, there are women taking charge and making a difference in an array of industries, and they're not getting there alone or by in-fighting and bullying.

One woman's success makes every woman stronger.

Elle U.K. hopes to change the narrative and encourage women to empower and support one another in the push for global equality. Because women represent just 14% of executive officers, and because there is plenty more room at the top.



Taylor Swift with her ever-growing squad of powerful women at the Video Music Awards. Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

It's more than a hashtag campaign, it's a commitment to a movement, complete with its own pledge:

"One woman's success makes EVERY WOMAN STRONGER. More women for #morewomen."

Even if you're not a political power player or celebrity, you can still take part in the #morewomen movement.

Whether you're running the room or working your way up in your field, there's a lot you can do to advance equality and make your community and the world better for women. Supporting projects and organizations like Let Girls Learn and Girl Effect are a great way to start.

And shopping at women-owned businesses is an easy way to invest in the success of other women right in your community. No act of support is too small.

The scales of justice are shifting toward equality, but there's still plenty of work to be done.

See a few of the women making it happen in this short video from Elle U.K.

True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less
via Tom Ward / Instagram

Artist Tom Ward has used his incredible illustration techniques to give us some new perspective on modern life through popular Disney characters. "Disney characters are so iconic that I thought transporting them to our modern world could help us see it through new eyes," he told The Metro.

Tom says he wanted to bring to life "the times we live in and communicate topical issues in a relatable way."

In Ward's "Alt Disney" series, Prince Charming and Pinocchio have fallen victim to smart phone addiction. Ariel is living in a polluted ocean, and Simba and Baloo have been abused by humans.

Keep Reading Show less
True
Back Market

Between the new normal that is working from home and e-learning for students of all ages, having functional electronic devices is extremely important. But that doesn't mean needing to run out and buy the latest and greatest model. In fact, this cycle of constantly upgrading our devices to keep up with the newest technology is an incredibly dangerous habit.

The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

So what's the solution? While no one expects you to stop purchasing new phones, laptops, and other devices, what you can do is consider where you're purchasing them from and how often in order to help improve the planet for future generations.

Keep Reading Show less

With many schools going virtual, many daycare facilities being closed or limited, and millions of parents working from home during the pandemic, the balance working moms have always struggled to achieve has become even more challenging in 2020. Though there are more women in the workforce than ever, women still take on the lion's share of household and childcare duties. Moms also tend to bear the mental load of keeping track of all the little details that keep family life running smoothly, from noticing when kids are outgrowing their clothing to keeping track of doctor and dentist appointments to organizing kids' extracurricular activities.

It's a lot. And it's a lot more now that we're also dealing with the daily existential dread of a global pandemic, social unrest, political upheaval, and increasingly intense natural disasters.

That's why scientist Gretchen Goldman's refreshingly honest photo showing where and how she conducted a CNN interview is resonating with so many.

Keep Reading Show less

Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

Keep Reading Show less