Who run the world? Girls.

Or girls and women to be exact, but who am I to argue with Queen B?

We women are busy running countries, leading companies, piloting technological and medical breakthroughs, dominating the world of sport, and in many cases, serving as primary caregivers for the next generation.



It's not easy being awesome, but somehow we manage. Right, Serena? Photo by Alex Goodlett/Getty Images.

But a troublesome new video from Elle U.K. illustrates the disparity between men and women in places of power.

From politics to Hollywood, women are often represented by a single voice in the room. The numbers don't lie. Women are 37% of MBA graduates, but only 4.6% of Fortune 500 CEOs. And this phenomenon is all too easy to see when men are edited out of the photos.


All GIFs by Elle U.K.

Having representation in places of power and influence is the only way women will achieve equality on a global scale. Because as the saying goes, when you don't have a seat at the table, it usually means you're on the menu.

The video was created as part of Elle U.K.'s #morewomen initiative.

Too often, successful women are portrayed as one-offs or exceptions. They're the take-no-prisoners alpha females who only reach new heights by walking on the backs of other women. In reality, there are women taking charge and making a difference in an array of industries, and they're not getting there alone or by in-fighting and bullying.

One woman's success makes every woman stronger.

Elle U.K. hopes to change the narrative and encourage women to empower and support one another in the push for global equality. Because women represent just 14% of executive officers, and because there is plenty more room at the top.



Taylor Swift with her ever-growing squad of powerful women at the Video Music Awards. Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

It's more than a hashtag campaign, it's a commitment to a movement, complete with its own pledge:

"One woman's success makes EVERY WOMAN STRONGER. More women for #morewomen."

Even if you're not a political power player or celebrity, you can still take part in the #morewomen movement.

Whether you're running the room or working your way up in your field, there's a lot you can do to advance equality and make your community and the world better for women. Supporting projects and organizations like Let Girls Learn and Girl Effect are a great way to start.

And shopping at women-owned businesses is an easy way to invest in the success of other women right in your community. No act of support is too small.

The scales of justice are shifting toward equality, but there's still plenty of work to be done.

See a few of the women making it happen in this short video from Elle U.K.

For the first time in its 56-year history, Sports Illustrated will feature a transgender model on its glossy cover. 23-year-old Brazilian model Valentina Sampaio will appear in the July issue, which hits stands early next week. Sampaio wrote on Instagram that she was "excited and honored" to be part of such an iconic issue, adding: "The team at SI has created yet another groundbreaking issue by bringing together a diverse set of multitalented, beautiful women in a creative and dignified way."

A native of Fortaleza, a city in northeastern Brazil, Sampaio has been making history in the fashion world in recent years. She was already the first trans model to make the 2017 cover of Vogue Paris. Scouted while she was a young teen, she quickly made her way onto key runways in her home country. She managed to make an impression in a short time— launching her career at 18 years old—as L'Oréal Paris's first trans model. She hit another milestone last year, when she was the face of Victoria's Secret campaign, breaking barriers as the first trans woman working with the brand.

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