What would you write in a love letter to the planet? Here are 19 beautiful examples.
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Unilever and the United Nations

Everyone knows that Paris is the city of love. But the Earth itself rarely gets the romance it deserves.

When you think about it, that's kinda messed up. Our home planet does so many amazing and selfless things for us. And what do we do in return? At best, we call it beautiful; at worst, we neglect and abuse it.

That ain't cool.



All photos by Thom Dunn/Upworthy.

But an art installation at Paris's Petit Palais aims to shower our planet with the love that it deserves.

The installation was created as part of the two-day Earth to Paris summit and coincided with the COP21 Climate Conference also going on in Paris. Activists and artists from all across the world were invited to share their messages of hope, love, and adoration for our dear Mother Earth. (and, by extension, the global leaders discussing climate action at COP21)

Here are some of our favorite letters to the Earth — in many languages, shapes, and sizes.

1.

"Earth, let's finally live together, it's time to clean up the trash. I love you." (Spanish)

2.

"Leaders, please have heart and think of humanity, survival and planet. It's time to act now or never!!"

3 and 4.


"Dear Global Leaders, Remember that the only reason you are all still alive is that my ecosystems allow you to. My ecosystems provide you all the service you need for your survival — food, water, air, raw materials, etc. If you do not stop the destruction you are causing, I will one day soon be unable to provide for you. You better get your act right or otherwise prepare to become fossils, too." (from Bahrain)

5.

"Dear Earth, I am you and you are me. What would I be without you? I love you!" (German)

6 and 7.

"Dear Mother Earth, I've known you my whole life. You've always know what I needed. You've given unselfishly to me and I've only taken. Taken and taken and taken — much more than my share. I recently realized how much I hurt you — all those years. I want to give it back and all of it. Mother Nature, I love you and I hope you forgive me."

8.

"Heart Beat of the Earth, Beat through me, to give me courage, to me life."

9 and 10.

"I love you Mother Earth because you nurse me and I nurse you when I die. That is fricking awesome. I love you."

11.

"Dear Planet Earth, It's so strange to express my feelings for you. As if I could express my feelings for everything I have ever known, ever been, and ever experienced. i come from you, am of you, and will return to you. Your carbon and water and molecule constitute me. Your plants sustain me, and your physics rule my world. You are big and beautiful and complex, and represent more to me than I could ever express."

12, 13, and 14.

"Earth, I love you because you are alive and blue." (Italian)

15.

"The best land we have — we do more than live on it. It is love, though selfish love — but for the common good." (Danish)

16 and 17.

"Dear Mother Earth, we are so incredibly grateful to you and appreciate all that you bring to us. You are so strong. Now it is our turn to be strong, and to stand up for you. You are unique, you are amazing, you are wonderful! Lots of love." (Swedish)

18.

"Dear Mother, I felt orphan for a long time, how come I forgot that I was your daughter? To touch your body, love my relatives and learn to solve our human "problems." (opportunities) is what heals me and detoxify us...preventing us to become cancerous cells. I want to be part of the cure rather than the disease. Pachamama, I know all this suffering and all to come are necessary because we are purifying ourselves, going from our egos to the eco, the concept of being one, of being you, and discovering that you are ... also the human nature. After 24 years of life is is pretty clear for me that I am here for you. My work here will be your work and I want to be your instrument. I promise to be a good daughter!"

19. And finally, from Morgan Freeman, on behalf of all of us:

You don't want to miss this.

What would you write?

Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
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